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  • #16
    Originally posted by Steve Machol
    Make sure you are using the exact customer number for this zip file.
    Yup - done.

    Still nothing.

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    • #17
      All I can suggess then is to reupload the original files and make absolutely asure you overwrite the ones on the server. This should not happen with the correct files and customer number.
      Steve Machol, former vBulletin Customer Support Manager (and NOT retired!)
      Change CKEditor Colors to Match Style (for 4.1.4 and above)

      Steve Machol Photography


      Mankind is the only creature smart enough to know its own history, and dumb enough to ignore it.


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      • #18
        Success! (version issue)

        Really did not want to do this - but I upgraded MySQL and PHP4 by using backported debian packages.

        I now have php4 v4.3.4 and mysql v4.0.16.

        The developers should know where the version cutoff should be - as the documentation should be changed. I am not sure if I would have purchased the product as it depends upon versions that several outstanding bugs. Doubt that the problem was within MySQL - as I would have seen errors in one of the log files.

        Anyways - I am presently pleased.

        Thanks to all that replied!
        Last edited by oragod; Mon 5 Jan '04, 11:39am.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Steve Machol
          All I can suggess then is to reupload the original files and make absolutely asure you overwrite the ones on the server. This should not happen with the correct files and customer number.
          In the course of working through my attempts - I had done this numerous times.

          Sounds as like level 1 support...?

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by welo
            Man, if I didn't have so much to do today I'd be real tempted to reimage my local Fedora box and install Debian just to see if I could re-create these issues. It's starting to sound like this is some kind of Debian-created Apache conflict due to some special security setting or whatever. You sure don't see Debian being used for web servers very often nowadays. I would seriously consider upgrading PHP though and see if that helps.
            Why would anyone install Fedora is beyond me!?

            Debian is very popular for server implementations - check the O'Reilly stats they seem to post every year. Can't be beat for stability and managabilty.

            Took your advice (as well as another earlier persons') and upgraded PHP (which also, via dependency, upgraded MySQL). See my earlier reply to this thread - I am up and running.

            Thanks again!

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by oragod
              Really did not want to do this - but I upgraded MySQL and PHP4 by using backported debian packages. ... The developers should know where the version cutoff should be - as the documentation should be changed. I am not sure if I would have purchased the product as it depends upon versions that several outstanding bugs.
              Saw these comments coming for miles (Debian folks a fairly predictable in this regard). In vB's defense, it's a tricky issue developing complex scripts to ensure backward capability when you run perpetually upgraded servers to keep hosting asf. competitive. I've run into this several times myself. Ultimately you're right though.


              Originally posted by oragod
              Why would anyone install Fedora is beyond me!?

              Debian is very popular for server implementations - check the O'Reilly stats they seem to post every year. Can't be beat for stability and managabilty.
              Heh. Well, I only am using it on my local network server for now, which was previously running RH9 (which I really like). With Redhat's move to halt support for all RH versions except RHEL, and since Fedora Core 1 is basically RH9 with stripped down update agents, I decided to go ahead and install it weekend before last and see how it did. I basically use this box to test things out so I don't risk borking my web server.

              From what I've seen though, Debian is most often used in company intranets due to its proven stability since admins have enough to do and don't feel much like keeping the boxes updated all the time. True, keeping abreast of the updates and patches can become a hassle, although the actual performance is normally superior.

              You have to be selective though. I doubt I'll be running PHP5 f.ex. for at least 6 months after it's stable release. I'm already having to go back through all kinds of old stuff to get it working again after turning register_globals off at the beginning of the year for security reasons.

              Anyway, glad you got it working.
              "I can't seem to bring myself to say, 'Well, I guess I'll be toddling along.'
              It isn't that I can't toddle. It's that I can't guess I'll toddle."

              --Robert Benchley (1889-1945)

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              • #22
                Originally posted by welo
                Saw these comments coming for miles (Debian folks a fairly predictable in this regard). In vB's defense, it's a tricky issue developing complex scripts to ensure backward capability when you run perpetually upgraded servers to keep hosting asf. competitive. I've run into this several times myself. Ultimately you're right though.


                I've been in the same situation myself - and on our projects, we have a standard that during development, the developers must keep versions in mind themselves. Its a pain in the backside to do afterwards. And I've missed some myself - so I understand.


                From what I've seen though, Debian is most often used in company intranets due to its proven stability since admins have enough to do and don't feel much like keeping the boxes updated all the time. True, keeping abreast of the updates and patches can become a hassle, although the actual performance is normally superior.
                We come from different worlds perhaps - because I would fight tooth and nail that Debian was easier to maintain (including updates and new versions). My server is running 'stable' - but my laptop runs a mix (the UI stuff generally have piles of bugs that slow it from getting into 'testing'). Large numbers of servers are easier to install, IMHO, as well - with many of the necessary packages already part of the main distribution. Having a 'pretty' install (ala RH) is irrelevant IMHO - as I don't reinstall very often (years rather than months)... just edit /etc/apt/sources.list and apt-get dist-upgrade.

                Anyways... way off topic.

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