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  • Amazon AWS / EC2 Hosting

    Hello - I apologize if this is the wrong forum.

    I was wondering what anyone's thoughts were on migrating a vB forum to "the cloud" from a dedicated server. My current forum has ~50k members with ~5k active (in last 3 months) and between 10-30k hits/day. The current hardware is old - about 4 years, and the forum has been around for about 12 years (approx 4.5GB DB uncompressed). My thoughts are:
    Leveraging "the cloud" hardware costs and failures approach 0 (not counting Amazon's current outage)
    Servers can be scaled up and down pretty easily and quickly
    Reddit uses them...

    Thanks for anyone's thoughts/ideas!

  • #2
    I think you underestimate how much work it would take to deploy a high availability environment.
    Oppressed.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by royo View Post
      I think you underestimate how much work it would take to deploy a high availability environment.
      I'm not sure if you're referring to AWS in general, but I do have experience deploying Citrix Farms, AD Networks, File & Print Server Farms, and MS-SQL Database Servers as both "standalone" public networks and in VPC networks, so creating a web server (or multiple) and a db server (or multiple) in the AWS environment doesn't seem to be any more difficult than deploying them in a dedicated/physical server environment.

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      • #4
        in the AWS environment doesn't seem to be any more difficult than deploying them in a dedicated/physical server environment.
        This is true because they don't differ, aside from having slightly worse and more unpredictable performance in the cloud.

        Reddit uses AWS because their platform was designed to be able to scale by adding more machines, and they actually need to do it during peak hours but with only 50k members, I doubt you'll be able to reap the benefits of scaling at a cheap price. It's one thing to be able to deploy an extra 34GB RAM db server for a few hours, which will only cost you several dollars, but for a low-end environment the savings are minimal and you end up spending too much time managing the environment.
        Oppressed.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by royo View Post
          This is true because they don't differ, aside from having slightly worse and more unpredictable performance in the cloud.

          Reddit uses AWS because their platform was designed to be able to scale by adding more machines, and they actually need to do it during peak hours but with only 50k members, I doubt you'll be able to reap the benefits of scaling at a cheap price. It's one thing to be able to deploy an extra 34GB RAM db server for a few hours, which will only cost you several dollars, but for a low-end environment the savings are minimal and you end up spending too much time managing the environment.
          Good point.

          The cost factor I'm thinking of though is this:
          Over the past 4 years, the server has cost about $9,600, and I still have the same physical server. At some point the hardware will die or become so outdated that I will be wasting a tremendous amount of money on old technology. It's like financing a Compaq Proliant 5000 Server for 15 years - sure it may have been top-of-the-line in its day, but today its ancient and you're still paying the same amount per month. The same money spent today would get you a tremendously more powerful server.

          If I upgrade the current hardware there is a large amount of time needed to be spent migrating data and re-setting up the new server. In the AWS environment, most of that has been taken care of / I am not involved with. I can spinup a new db server on a whim and migrate the data fairly quickly. I can then even re-map IPs quickly to minimize downtime.

          I've also estimated monthly costs (based on current usage) to be more than half as expensive as it is now.

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          • #6
            If you go to the Cloud, you need to make sure you have backups both of your data and redundancy. EC2 crashed yesterday and took down some fairly well known sites with it. Including Reddit.

            http://mashable.com/2011/04/22/amazon-cloud-collapse/

            One of the sites I visit regularly, Hollywood.com, is back up but they appear to be missing a lot of data.
            Translations provided by Google.

            Wayne Luke
            The Rabid Badger - a vBulletin Cloud demonstration site.
            vBulletin 5 API - Full / Mobile
            Vote for your favorite feature requests and the bugs you want to see fixed.

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            • #7
              Someone who used give us some idea?

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