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How did YOU learn PHP? (And recommendations please!) (vBTEAM please take part2!)

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  • WhiteSnake
    replied
    someone can please recommend me a book related to oop-php?

    Leave a comment:


  • Xeno Blackheart
    replied
    I'm still learning. Just got the basics down really, if anyone has any advice for php (vB Code in general, so I can make hacks and such), it'd be appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • bahbah
    replied
    Originally posted by Freddie Bingham
    First learned Basic on the Commodore 64 :0

    Then Pascal and C at College back in 93 or so. Moved onto Borland C++ Builder for awhile. Picked up PHP strictly from vBulletin and the php website. If you know any structured language similar to C then the syntax will come easily. The difficult part is learning to follow a smart paradigm in your code so that you are not constantly needing to redesign your work. You can pick it up froms book but much of it is theory and is learned on the cuff.
    I first learned Basic on the Amstrad64

    Then Pascal at College back in 94

    Then Perl from wanting to customise UBB. Then PHP from the PHP website because I wanted to learn how vbulletin worked, and to write my own CMS.

    Nothing beats learning when you have a project in mind. The incentive makes learning fun....always

    Leave a comment:


  • Revanza
    replied
    Originally posted by Freddie Bingham
    The difficult part is learning to follow a smart paradigm in your code so that you are not constantly needing to redesign your work. You can pick it up froms book but much of it is theory and is learned on the cuff.
    Im facing that problem, I am almost constantly rewriting the core of my "gem" project.
    Is there a way to identify if what you are doing is defined as "constantly redesigning" or "improving" your code?
    I would consider myself as still in learning, as I have just recently (in the recent redesign of my work, actually ) learnt how class() can be used to cache arrays (like vBulletin does with its datastore).
    Im worried that this issue will linger on to when (or rather, if) I get a job where Im on the clock, which would negatively effect both me and my employer.
    So the bottom line is, could you (or anyone else who has experience with this) please elaborate?

    Leave a comment:


  • merk
    replied
    Originally posted by Scott MacVicar
    The book i used was Core PHP 2nd Edition by Leon Atkinson though I now think its on the 3rd or 4th Edition which covers PHP 5.
    The book of champions.

    Leave a comment:


  • Freddie Bingham
    replied
    First learned Basic on the Commodore 64 :0

    Then Pascal and C at College back in 93 or so. Moved onto Borland C++ Builder for awhile. Picked up PHP strictly from vBulletin and the php website. If you know any structured language similar to C then the syntax will come easily. The difficult part is learning to follow a smart paradigm in your code so that you are not constantly needing to redesign your work. You can pick it up froms book but much of it is theory and is learned on the cuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • Razasharp
    replied
    Thank you all for replying (and everyone else please keep them coming!)

    Just to add, for people interested in learning - If you are going to go down the book route, get yourself down your local book shop and spend some time with the books that you have seen 'recommended' as writing styles differ and ideally you want to find one that matches your reading style. I did this last week when I had some time to kill and was superised that a few of the books that some people said were good, were not and some that some people said were not so good actually were! Basically you will get fans of all books and likewise, there will be people who don't like the same book! Therefore its a good thing to get a book that you feel comfortable with, because you'll be more likely to finsih it

    Leave a comment:


  • Kier
    replied
    I learned Pascal and C++ at university, then learned the basics of PHP from vB Lite when it was available, and then from vBulletin version 1. Subsequent knowledge has come from innumerable resources.

    Leave a comment:


  • RagingPenguin
    replied
    I started out in 1991 writing Windows API programs using Borland C++ / OWL (Object Windows Library - an abstraction layer). In 1995 I moved to an all Microsoft IDE (mostly used Visual Basic), became Microsoft certified, then dumped them in 2000. I picked up PHP fairly easily. I miss the 'friend' keyword, default object properties/functions and namespaces, but other than that, PHP runs circles around anything else.

    I never went to school for any of this so even though the syntax and usage was easy to learn, the more esoteric things, like system analysis, process flowcharting and such were a pain, and I'm still not the best at it. I learned the most by doing. I've never been a 'book' person. 'Show me' is my motto.

    My recommendation: join http://sitepoint.com/forums and ask anything and everything you can think of AFTER you've searched for it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Reeve of Shinra
    replied
    Sitepoint has an excellent starter book "php and mysql development for websites" or something.

    Leave a comment:


  • ケネース
    replied
    Originally posted by Alan @ CIT
    I started programming way back in the day with C, then C++. I started learning PHP as v3 was coming into existance from a friend of mine.

    8 or 9 books later, hundreds of scripts, and a lot of tutorials and mannual reading, and I'd say I'm fairly proficent in PHP

    As for learning PHP, I'd suggest getting either a "PHP 5 for Dummies" book if you know absolutly nothing about it, or a "Learn PHP 5 in 24 Hours" book if you know the basics.

    Advanced coders: If your looking for a decent book on PHP5 OOP and design patterns, grab a copy of "PHP 5 Objects, Patterns, and Practice" by Matt Zandstra - by far the best book I've found for showing how Design Patterns can be effecticly used. Particularly for programmer who don't have a Java background.
    If a PHP book is written by Janel Valade, don't get it. Trust me.
    I also suggest you rather go to php.net or google tutorials than to buy PHP for dummies.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dean C
    replied
    I sacrificed my soul to the PHP gods and in return they gave me knowledge.

    Leave a comment:


  • Floris
    replied
    I learned from Faruk & Scott, Kier, and through trial & error. I also had to just give it a go. Usually I learn from trying to find and understand bugs and attempt to fix them.

    To be honest, I feel I still don't know anything that I should.

    Leave a comment:


  • Alan @ CIT
    replied
    I started programming way back in the day with C, then C++. I started learning PHP as v3 was coming into existance from a friend of mine.

    8 or 9 books later, hundreds of scripts, and a lot of tutorials and mannual reading, and I'd say I'm fairly proficent in PHP

    As for learning PHP, I'd suggest getting either a "PHP 5 for Dummies" book if you know absolutly nothing about it, or a "Learn PHP 5 in 24 Hours" book if you know the basics.

    Advanced coders: If your looking for a decent book on PHP5 OOP and design patterns, grab a copy of "PHP 5 Objects, Patterns, and Practice" by Matt Zandstra - by far the best book I've found for showing how Design Patterns can be effecticly used. Particularly for programmer who don't have a Java background.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scott MacVicar
    replied
    I originally learnt Perl back in 1998 and then PHP after my friend Derek prompted me to do so so that I could write modifications for this new thing called vBulletin 2.0 beta.

    Since I started learning that I've also picked up C and its derivatives, Java and C#.

    The book i used was Core PHP 2nd Edition by Leon Atkinson though I now think its on the 3rd or 4th Edition which covers PHP 5.

    Leave a comment:

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