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  • Copyrights

    I am mildly interested in copyrighting a piece of software that I am writing, simply because it seems that the filing fee is $30 and will take effect in "only" four to five months. According to http://www.copyright.gov/ , software can be copyrighted via Form TX (http://www.copyright.gov/forms/formtxi.pdf).

    Some questions, though:

    1. The software that I am writing involves translations. What would be the implications of that: separate copyright fees, separate copyrights entirely, requiring the translators to sign over rights...what? I do not know if the translators will be international or not, but it is likely that at least some of the three are.

    2. How do I submit the software? It's not entirely clear, but the form implies that I should sent a CD of absolutely everything assocated with it.

    3. The software will be updated, mostly with bug fixes, occasionally with new features. Implications?

    4. If I ever needed the copyright notice to defend myself in court or bring a lawsuit against a plagarizer, would a registered copyright truly be effective, or would I have to go through the expensive drudgery of filing for a patent and waiting an eternity?

    I know that this isn't a legal forum, but it's just a casual set of questions so any help would be appreciated. I also know that my work is implicitly copyrighted as soon as it is created, so please don't reiterate this fact. I'm less than an hour from D.C., but I really don't want to take a trip if possible. I hate D.C.
    --filburt1, vBulletin.org/vBulletinTemplates.com moderator
    Web Design Forums.net: vB Board of the Month
    vBulletin Mail System (vBMS): webmail for your forum users

  • #2
    Not to through your post off topic, but...
    Originally posted by filburt1
    I hate D.C.

    I made a trip back there to visit after being gone for over ten years... I lasted 2 hours and could wait to get the hell out of there!

    As far as your questions, I would not think that you would have to copyright each translated version. As far as the CD they request you send, what do they want you to send, the entire source code?

    Comment


    • #3
      speaking of copyrights that are legally registered, howcome i don't see in the database vbulletin?

      Comment


      • #4
        vB is not purely a US-made product, for one. The company is based in the UK.
        --filburt1, vBulletin.org/vBulletinTemplates.com moderator
        Web Design Forums.net: vB Board of the Month
        vBulletin Mail System (vBMS): webmail for your forum users

        Comment


        • #5
          You don't need to send it to them to secure your copyright.

          Anything you do is copyrighted by you, what you will need to do to stop an issue with someone taking it and claiming it is theres is some how record the date when you first published it or first released it.

          One way is by sending it to yourself as sealed letter, which would contain the date stamp.

          But what that site seems to be is a goverment set up organisation that will do the same as sending it to yourself with a date on it.

          I wouldn't think you would need to do a copy of all the different languages unless the features differer a lot for each one, if it is just simple translations i doubt you would, but make sure on that.

          And basically, you would need something to prove you created the product before someone else, what ever method suits you, but in the courts the person who could produce the evidence that they created the product first would win.

          My legal knowledge isn't the best, but done a law module on my computing course which did outline a few things like this.

          Comment


          • #6
            1. I said in bold red text that I know all of my work is implicitly copyrighted.
            2. The Copyright Office's site says specifically not to send a copy to one's self as it no more legally powerful than the implicit copyright.

            --filburt1, vBulletin.org/vBulletinTemplates.com moderator
            Web Design Forums.net: vB Board of the Month
            vBulletin Mail System (vBMS): webmail for your forum users

            Comment


            • #7
              Then what you need help on? want us to hold your hand and just reassure you?

              You have nothing to worry about then, and the point still stands, sending it to a layer or something like that is what is the ideal way of doing it, but as i said, this just seems like a goverment set up organisation to handle with it. and at the end of the day, you need something to prove that you have the first date (which is what i said before, but seems i needed to of wrote it in red bold) that sending it to yourself with the correct way of doing it via the postal service which would create logs (not just putting it in an envolpe with your address) would be the fine.

              But if you are going to be that nice to people who try to help and not make the topic go off, do the following research:

              1. Go and learn what you actually copyright
              2. Learn to read that web site

              I said my law knowledge isn't the best, but just trying to help with the knowledge i do have, if you are going to reply like that then i hope no one chooses to help.

              Comment


              • #8
                There's no need to be rude because I did not intend to be. I am simply reiterating what is on the Copyright Office's site. I posted here because many people are professionals who have likely dealt with this before. I am capable of reading so please don't be condesending.

                I’ve heard about a “poor man’s copyright.” What is it?
                The practice of sending a copy of your own work to yourself is sometimes called a “poor man’s copyright.” There is no provision in the copyright law regarding any such type of protection, and it is not a substitute for registration.
                (http://www.copyright.gov/help/faq/faq-general.html)
                --filburt1, vBulletin.org/vBulletinTemplates.com moderator
                Web Design Forums.net: vB Board of the Month
                vBulletin Mail System (vBMS): webmail for your forum users

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Andrew-ningc
                  One way is by sending it to yourself as sealed letter, which would contain the date stamp.
                  Myth. Completely false - never stood in court, and never will. Did you know that post office delivers open envelopes?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Andrew-ningc
                    You don't need to send it to them to secure your copyright.

                    Anything you do is copyrighted by you, what you will need to do to stop an issue with someone taking it and claiming it is theres is some how record the date when you first published it or first released it.
                    An unregistered copyright does in fact exist once original work is created, but you get more rights with a registered one. To illustrate you will have a near impossible time suing for damages (as opposed to just getting the infridging work removed) without a registered one in US.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Copyrighting software only protects the source code, it does not stop someone from producing something that does the exact same thing; for that you would need a patent.

                      You could just keep the source to yourself.

                      Although if this is PHP or another language like that where the source would be distributed, then get it registered and be done with it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It is a PHP product.

                        I don't want to file for a patent...nearly $1,000 and many months or years is just not worth it IMO, especially because the product would likely have major new features in that timeframe.
                        --filburt1, vBulletin.org/vBulletinTemplates.com moderator
                        Web Design Forums.net: vB Board of the Month
                        vBulletin Mail System (vBMS): webmail for your forum users

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Then use a licensing key or source code encryption system.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I don't want to encrypt the source code because (while I don't encourage it for support reasons), I want others to still be able to modify the code, just like vBulletin.

                            I don't want to even waste the time to build in anti-piracy protection because it is always broken for any product in existence, especially so with PHP products for obvious reasons.
                            --filburt1, vBulletin.org/vBulletinTemplates.com moderator
                            Web Design Forums.net: vB Board of the Month
                            vBulletin Mail System (vBMS): webmail for your forum users

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Might want to look into GoDaddy.com's copyright services? They apply to websites, and since you're distributing via your website, one would reason that it would extend to your script as well? Sorry, I'm not much of a legal expert.

                              This is for your vB mail system, I conjecture? Not PassProg, eh?
                              :)

                              Comment

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