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  • absence of color

    i guess it's a common misconception to say "black is the absence of color, and white is all colors blended together"

    I've read around, and people make that statement, then others counter it by reversing it.

    But then shouldn't the HEX color code "000000" be white, and vice versa for "FFFFFF"?

    I've heard explanations for this dealing with the physics of color...

    so could someone please straighten this whole matter out for me?

    thanks

    -jamslam
    http://www.webtrickscentral.com/images/wtcsig.jpg

  • #2
    Well, 000000 means the color has a red green and blue intensity of 0 (absense of any color at all) and FFFFFF means the color has a red green and blue intensity of 255 (FF is 255 in hex), so it is all the colors blended together. However, the way the computer mixes color is different from the way the color spectrum in real life works, so you can't really go like that.

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    • #3
      If you take a bunch of jars of colored paint, and mix them together, you surely aren't going to get white. You're going to get a thick black. So I always say black is all colors, and white is the absense.
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      • #4
        No object except light actually has color. Those objects just reflect certain colors. A "white" object is an object that reflects every color of light. A "black" object reflects no light. A "green" object only reflects green light, etc.. That mixture you created by combining every "color" of paint is just an object that no longer reflects any color.

        000000 is therefore a good value for black. 000000 is the hex for 0 red, 0 green, and 0 blue. FF, being 255 (the max of a color in hex) represents red, blue, and, green to make FFFFFF; which is appropriate since white is the reflection of every color.

        i guess it's a common misconception to say "black is the absence of color, and white is all colors blended together"
        This is no misconception, it is the truth.
        Last edited by UHN_ED; Fri 21 Nov '03, 6:57pm.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by UHN_ED
          No object except light actually has color. Those objects just reflect certain colors. A "white" object is an object that reflects every color of light. A "black" object reflects no light. A "green" object only reflects green light, etc.. That mixture you created by combining every "color" of paint is just an object that no longer reflects any color.

          000000 is therefore a good value for black. 000000 is the hex for 0 red, 0 green, and 0 blue. FF, being 255 (the max of a color in hex) represents red, blue, and, green to make FFFFFF; which is appropriate since white is the reflection of every color.


          This is no misconception, it is the truth.
          so since a green object reflects green, it absorbs (i forget the colors to make green... magenta and red maybe?)

          so since light is the only thing with color, and when something reflects no light you get black... therefore black does have to be the absence of color... if my train of though correct?
          http://www.webtrickscentral.com/images/wtcsig.jpg

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jamslam
            so since a green object reflects green, it absorbs (i forget the colors to make green... magenta and red maybe?)
            No, actually it absorbs all colors except green. Light colors and art colors are two very different things.

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            • #7
              Green is a natural color in the rainbow, so it does not need anthing to be combined to be seen.

              For colors that are not in the rainbow, the object reflects multiple colors that are in it to make that color. It does not absorb a color for it to be seen, nor does it absorb colors to combine; it is all reflections.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by UHN_ED
                Green is a natural color in the rainbow, so it does not need anthing to be combined to be seen.

                For colors that are not in the rainbow, the object reflects multiple colors that are in it to make that color. It does not absorb a color for it to be seen, nor does it absorb colors to combine; it is all reflections.
                All of the colors you see are natural colors in the rainbow, when white light is viewd through a prism. Prehaps I should have qualified my statement as how you get green when using pigments and or crayons.

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                • #9
                  Anyone ever tried passing "black" light through a prism and get to see colors?

                  It should be fairly obvious as early as grade school... white is the presence of all color ... the paint example is an awkward representation, since the chemical composition of paint doesn't correlate with "light" and the base paint color is just a simulation of the actual interpretation made by our eyes...

                  There is a color wheel example in grade school books ... there was this trick that if you spin the wheel fast enough so that the human eye cannot distinguish between colors, the color you get is white, not black...
                  Last edited by Tolitz; Sat 22 Nov '03, 1:38am.
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CeleronXT
                    If you take a bunch of jars of colored paint, and mix them together, you surely aren't going to get white. You're going to get a thick black. So I always say black is all colors, and white is the absense.
                    Colour Theory 101

                    When dealing with light (as in the case of your monitor screen), in which the primary colours are red, green and blue, we talk about an additive colour mixing process - that being, the more colour you add, the closer towards white you get.

                    When dealing with paint (primary colours red, yellow and blue) or print (primary colours cyan, magenta and yellow) the situation is reversed and we talk about a subtractive colour process, whereby adding more colour to a mix will tend it further away from white.

                    Therefore, when dealing with colour notation for on-screen colours, we must deal with additive colours, and hence #FFFFFF (full red, full green, full blue) is absolutely the correct way to indicate white.

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                    • #11
                      alright thanks everyone, i'm pretty sure i have a firm grasp on it now
                      http://www.webtrickscentral.com/images/wtcsig.jpg

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                      • #12
                        <---raises hand.

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                        • #13
                          Ony if you are taking Beginning Physics.
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