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  • Help me choose a new router

    I'm looking for a new router to connect my network to the Internet using an existing cable modem.

    I require a built in switch, at least 4-port but more would be acceptable.
    The ability to monitor all incoming and outgoing traffic is a must as I want to be able to detect any hacking attempts and prevent certain software from connecting to particular websites.

    What would you recommend?

    The Netgear RP614 has been suggested to me.

    Will this do what I need?

    Thanks
    Sig? What sig?

  • #2
    Netgear is good.

    Routers that have switches instead of hubs are not common and are likely significantly more expensive...it might be cheaper to get a 1-port router and attach a switch to it.
    --filburt1, vBulletin.org/vBulletinTemplates.com moderator
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    • #3
      So you think the Netgear RP614 will do exaclty what I need?

      Stop adds and porn coming in from known sites.
      Stop programs accessing known sites.
      Show me a log of all access attempts and block them.
      Last edited by DarkDelight.net; Sun 16 Nov '03, 5:47am.
      Sig? What sig?

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      • #4
        Sounds like you'd be better with a dedicated firewall.

        www.smoothwall.org

        that runs on the most simpliest machine.

        P1 100mhz and 32mb RAM will do it.

        Just plug in your cable modem in to that and then the other cable in to your plain regular switch.
        Scott MacVicar

        My Blog | Twitter

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        • #5
          I would suggest the BEFSR41 or the BEFSR81 from Linksys. Never had any luck with a single Netgear router lasting more than a year and a friend had one which wouldn't allow Mac's to fill in "POST" based HTML forms.

          Both are great wired routers. I have two of the BEFSR41's at home and have used them in about 20 different home networks set up for friends and family and not had a single problem. They even support AOL Broadband out of the box. The only difference between the 41 and the 81 is the number of LAN ports, 4 and 8 respectively. The BEFSR41 costs about $50.00 here in the states... I am not sure about UK prices though.
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          Wayne Luke
          The Rabid Badger - a vBulletin Cloud demonstration site.
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          • #6
            Definately Linksys
            Why do you want to monitor traffic so specifically? are you running a web or ftp server?
            MCSE, MVP, CCIE
            Microsoft Beta Team

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            • #7
              Forget Linksys, go with SMC.
              Check out this router.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Asendin
                Definately Linksys
                Why do you want to monitor traffic so specifically? are you running a web or ftp server?
                No.
                I would not be opposed to running a FTP server though, but I don't know if my ISP will allow it.
                I mainly want to stop software with built in spyware contacting home and installing more **** on my machines.
                Sig? What sig?

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                • #9
                  it looks like you have to download another program to stop the spyware...

                  A free, 1-year subscription to FreedomĀ® security and privacy software blocks ads and prevents personal information from being sent over the Internet (for up to 8 Windows-based computers).
                  So you get 1 year of this program to stop what you want. It isnt the router itself stopping the pr0n and spyware...

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                  • #10
                    I don't think typical NAT firewalls in a router do that. It will allow (usually) traffic that has been requested by the originating system (spyware would fall into this category). What you need is either a hardware or software firewall that can watch outbound requests, and notify you (or block).
                    Tiny Personal Firewall is the one I use in conjunction with NAT to prevent this sort of thing.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by wbear
                      I don't think typical NAT firewalls in a router do that. It will allow (usually) traffic that has been requested by the originating system (spyware would fall into this category). What you need is either a hardware or software firewall that can watch outbound requests, and notify you (or block).
                      Tiny Personal Firewall is the one I use in conjunction with NAT to prevent this sort of thing.
                      So, you're saying I need a dedicated gateway box?
                      Sig? What sig?

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                      • #12
                        I've got the netgear RP614, it's alright I suppose. I used to have a lot of trouble with it though, the port forwarding wasn't working properly so I had it unplugged for a couple months. Then yesterday I hooked it back up so I could play my X-BOX live -- works fine now.

                        (My mom thinks its faster lol )

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                        • #13
                          What is "Stateful Packet Inspection" ?

                          The Netgear FR314 supports this
                          Sig? What sig?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by DarkDelight.net
                            So, you're saying I need a dedicated gateway box?
                            (regarding my post about NAT and outbound connections)
                            While that would be more secure, no. All you usually need is the NAT firewall at the "gate", with the added protection on the local system of a software firewall will help to prevent anything 'calling home' without you knowing. Inbound requests are mostly blocked by the router.

                            If you had a lot of systems connecting to this LAN, and had to keep all of them secure from this sort of threat (remotely), then it would make sense to use a hardware solution. Of course, if you had a box lying around that you wanted to use as a dedicated firewall, this is also possible, and much cheaper than an off-the-shelf hardware solution.

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                            • #15
                              A router only stops incoming protocols, a software stops outbound, i suggest tiny personal firewall 2.0, it's free and fast.
                              Running vB since 4-14-2002

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