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  • SuSE?

    I'm thinking of going from redhat to SuSE, now I've got a few questions. What version should I run? How many CDs is it? Where should I download it? Is it better than red hat 9? Is it an ISO or ran off the CD?

    I really want an ISO.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    My personal opinion is that Suse is better than Redhat. You can get it at www.suse.com and it is available as ISO's or as a live-cd Distro.

    Personally, I got my copy at Best Buy for $39.95 because I feel I should support software.
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    • #3
      Wayne, I am currently running Redhat on a 233MHz, 96MB, 6GB computer. Do you think I would be able to explore Suse on it? The sys req say 64MB and 6GB.

      I'm always looking for new Linux distrobutions.
      Trent Gillespie Mod Theater Gillespie Photography

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      • #4
        I was running Redhat Linux 9 on a AMD Athlon 1700+ XP with 1 Gigabyte of RAM and a 40 GB 7200 RPm ATA-133 IDE drive. There were notices pauses in execution, KDE constantly crashed and there were memory leaks causing me to reboot my PC daily if not more often.

        I switched to SUSE running KDE on the same machine and have not rebooted since I installed nor has KDE crashed once.

        Since Suse started as a Redhat derivative, I would say it will work on your PC and work better. Burn yourself a copy of the LiveCD for Suse and try it out before installing.
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        • #5
          Why are you looking at switching? If you're looking into exploring Linux more, then switching to SuSe won't give you any added benefit.

          I run Slackware on my desktop machine, and Gentoo on my Laptop.

          Both of which are very good distros for learning with. I'd only recommend Gentoo if you have a pretty swift machine, and ADSL (or better).
          FFAddicts: [site|forums]

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Wayne Luke
            You can get it at www.suse.com and it is available as ISO's or as a live-cd Distro.
            SuSE is not available as ISOs for the x86 plattform.

            There is only a FTP install version available for free download. The CD boot image for the FTP version can be downloaded here: ftp://ftp.suse.com/pub/suse/i386/current/boot/boot.iso (20MB)

            The LiveCD is mainly an evaluation version.

            Originally posted by Wayne Luke
            Since Suse started as a Redhat derivative, I would
            SuSE is not a Red Hat derivative, see: http://www.distrowatch.com/stats.php...n=independence
            Contentteller Community Forums

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            • #7
              Suse's YAST is ok and used to set it apart from other distros IMO. However the middle ground has changed, most distros have caught up.

              GW: Your question is nearly impossible to answer because you do not say what your uses and requirements are. I'd recommend Mandrake 9.1 if you want an Eye Candy desktop but that still requires decent hardware. Otherwise try out linux or *bsd that you can bolt together. The problem with Redhat is that it installs a large amount of bloat, avoiding this is some peoples main reason to move to linux in the first place. Other distros, as mentioned already Slackware or OpenBSD/FreeBSD are very basic out of the box distros. You'll find you'll need to compile most things you need or install them from the *BSD ports system. This should result in a system only running the things you really need and are aware of - which should allow you to become more experienced with each component and also make it more secure.

              The beauty of linux: there are plenty of horses for courses, you just need to find the right one.

              On a side note, my comment above reminds me a of a Microsoft Endorsed document on using Linux in business [pdf] [pdf as html] [doc] where having lots of distrobutions of linux has been called a bad thing™ Having a customised O/S which suits you needs, and your needs only is a great thing!™
              HP DL-380 G6, 2x E5520, 28GB RAM, 4x300GB SAS, VMWare ESXi
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              • #8
                When SuSE was at 8.1 it couldn't resize NTFS partitions. Can it do this in 8.2 personal?

                I may put it on my laptop if it can. I know that I can resize them myself, but my need for linux is too little to go through that, I am lazy.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Philipp
                  SuSE is not a Red Hat derivative, see: http://www.distrowatch.com/stats.php...n=independence
                  Hmmm.. Funny. That site doesn't list Mandrake as a Redhat Derivative either. Especially funny since both are. Maybe since both are considered their own distributions now and do their own programming and not reliant on Redhat for new releases they don't list it.

                  However when Suse was first released it was a Redhat derivative and has diverged from there.
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by UHN_ED
                    When SuSE was at 8.1 it couldn't resize NTFS partitions. Can it do this in 8.2 personal?

                    I may put it on my laptop if it can. I know that I can resize them myself, but my need for linux is too little to go through that, I am lazy.
                    NTFS support in most Linux distributions is at a Read-Only state. Not sure of any that can resize an NTFS partition with any degree of perfection. When I ran Redhat with NTFS, it destroyed the file structure on the drive so I would recommend against accessing NTFS drives completely until kernal support is more stable.
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                    Wayne Luke
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                    • #11
                      Okay, thanks.

                      If I have a bigger need for it, I will just wipe my drive and partition it before installing XP so I can have one partition with a linux fiilesystem.

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                      • #12
                        Just see if you can get a copy of Partition Magic and use that to resize the NTFS partition. If you live in Europe, you can purchase a copy of Suse Linux with Partition Magic while supplies last on their website.
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                        Wayne Luke
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                        vBulletin 5 API - Full / Mobile
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                        • #13
                          Ok, my specs are pretty crappy but here goes:

                          900Mhz AMD Athlon Processer
                          40GB HDD
                          128mb RAM
                          ..decent cards and stuff
                          Also just got a new motherboard.

                          [edit] So which is best? It's mainly just home use for a lil bit of coding, hacking, etc.
                          Last edited by Game Wizards; Sun 10th Aug '03, 2:08am.

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                          • #14
                            Best is subjective. I don't think your stats are that bad, maybe increase the memory to 256 but other than that it is good.

                            My suggestion to you is to download and try several Linux Distros to see which one you like. All it costs is the cost of making CD's for them.
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                            Wayne Luke
                            The Rabid Badger - a vBulletin Cloud demonstration site.
                            vBulletin 5 API - Full / Mobile
                            Vote for your favorite feature requests and the bugs you want to see fixed.

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                            • #15
                              Ok thanks, I'll use KDE and everything, I'm just wondering what you think the best is to try and why, I'd like speed and stability as this redhat, as you've said several times, is forever crashing and lagging.

                              Thanks

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