Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can you please help me with this?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Can you please help me with this?

    Can someone please balance the following chemical equation for me? I always have trouble with this stuff, and I'd appreciate it greatly if you could do it and tell me exactly what you did. I keep screwing it up somehow.

    Al + H[2]SO[4] --> Al[2](SO[4])[3] + H[2]

    [#] means that number is a subscript. Please help! Thanks!!!!
    | DiscBurn | CD & DVD Replication services, film and VHS to DVD, and duplication equipment
    |
    Disc On Demand | Short-run CD & DVD duplication... all online.

  • #2
    [2]Al + [3](H[2]SO[4]) --> Al[2](SO[4])[3] + [3](H[2])
    :)

    Comment


    • #3
      directpixel's balanced equation looks good to me.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks so much!

        I am horrible with balancing them. I try and try, but they never end out correct. Luckily next year I am in Physics. It looks much better then Chemistry. My favorite high school science course has been Physical Science.
        | DiscBurn | CD & DVD Replication services, film and VHS to DVD, and duplication equipment
        |
        Disc On Demand | Short-run CD & DVD duplication... all online.

        Comment


        • #5
          answer is always "C"
          MCSE, MVP, CCIE
          Microsoft Beta Team

          Comment


          • #6
            I have one more question -- in there, what would be the aqeous, etc things in the equation. So the (s), (l), (g), and (aq). I never understand that stuff either.
            | DiscBurn | CD & DVD Replication services, film and VHS to DVD, and duplication equipment
            |
            Disc On Demand | Short-run CD & DVD duplication... all online.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Lacrosse Boy
              I have one more question -- in there, what would be the aqeous, etc things in the equation. So the (s), (l), (g), and (aq). I never understand that stuff either.
              Aluminum is a solid. I think the sulfuric acid is going to be aqueous because it's a strong acid. I think Aluminum sulfate is a solid. H2 is a gas. That would mean the spectator is H2.

              I'm not positive though.

              Comment


              • #8
                S = Solid
                L = Liquid
                G = Gas
                Aq = Aqueous
                ManagerJosh, Owner of 4 XenForo Licenses, 1 vBulletin Legacy License, 1 Internet Brands Suite License
                Director, WorldSims.org | Gaming Hosting Administrator, SimGames.net, Urban Online Entertainment

                Comment


                • #9
                  wait wait wait. Sulfuric acid doesn't break apart into H2 gas and sulfate ion, it has two ionizations.

                  H2(SO4) -> H+ + H(SO4)-
                  H(SO4)- -> H+ + SO4^2-

                  I'm still not positive though. Last semester is too far back to remember.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sure, you can balance these little equations, but can you tell me what the potential energy of an object 10,500km high is? Or how long it will take him to fall? Chemistry is for n00bs.
                    Chen Avinadav
                    Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt.

                    גם אני מאוכזב מסיקור תחרות לתור מוטור של NRG הרשת ע"י מעריב

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Chen
                      Sure, you can balance these little equations, but can you tell me what the potential energy of an object 10,500km high is?
                      Need a mass (or a force) to calculate that....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        chemistry sucks. I hate it!

                        ...and I have to take one more chemistry class for my major

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          potential enery = mass x gravity x height

                          gravity is 9.8ms^-2 and you stated the height as 10,500km = 1,050,000m though thats in space.... or is that 10,500m?
                          Scott MacVicar

                          My Blog | Twitter

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Scott MacVicar
                            potential enery = mass x gravity x height

                            gravity is 9.8ms^-2 and you stated the height as 10,500km = 1,050,000m though thats in space.... or is that 10,500m?
                            That's true when the height =~ Earth's radius. But when you're in outer space it's not like that, and the gravity isn't constant so everything changes.
                            Chen Avinadav
                            Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt.

                            גם אני מאוכזב מסיקור תחרות לתור מוטור של NRG הרשת ע"י מעריב

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Gravity is never constant.

                              9.8 m/s^2 is an estimate at the surface of the earth. It changes (very minutely) if something is not on the surface (eg. 10ft in the air).
                              :)

                              Comment

                              widgetinstance 262 (Related Topics) skipped due to lack of content & hide_module_if_empty option.
                              Working...
                              X