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  • #16
    Why do I keep reading "since Columbia did not have the robot arm installed for this flight, the crew was unable to get any pictures of the damage"? Where is this picture from if they were unable to see the damage?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by freddie
      Why do I keep reading "since Columbia did not have the robot arm installed for this flight, the crew was unable to get any pictures of the damage"? Where is this picture from if they were unable to see the damage?
      I do believe they have windows up there... it's like you look out the window of an airplane and you see the wing. Except it's not an airplane.
      Chen Avinadav
      Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt.

      גם אני מאוכזב מסיקור תחרות לתור מוטור של NRG הרשת ע"י מעריב

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      • #18
        I would say that picture would be classified under the category of "inspection" but then we have this: "Columbia was not carrying its 50-foot robot arm and camera because they were not needed on the research mission, so its crew was unable to inspect the damage."

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Chen
          Anyway, here's a picture of the left wing of the Columbia from last week. They had a video conference with our prime minister and this shot was taken during the meeting. Can't comment on the credibility of the image but it appeared on all newspapers here today.
          First of all, the underside of the wing is black. The top *is* white-ish, but as far as I know doesn't contain giant, horribly un aerodynamic, black metal struts or whatever those shown in the picture are. When you travel at 15,000MPH you don't leave exposed surfaces like that.

          Two good shots of the exterior are here:
          http://www.now-india.com/general/sp...es/columbia.jpg
          and here:
          http://www.exploratorium.edu/origin...ges/shuttle.jpg

          As you can also see, there are no rearward facing windows, so they'd have to be in the cargo bay to take that shot, which was (if I recall correctly)
          1) full of experiments and
          2) doesn't have any windows.

          I claim hoax.
          Matt
          Sybase DBA / PHP fanatic
          Sybase v. MySQL v. Oracle | Why I don't like MySQL | Download Sybase TODAY! | Visit DBForums.com!

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          • #20
            Very much a hoax...
            Bike Forums.net

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            • #21
              There was no way for them to go out and look at the damage to any tiles and if they had known of damage, no way to fix it. There are inherent risks in space flight as there are in driving cars and flying in airplanes and breathing. Hopefully this wasn't due to some contractor trying to save $$$. I'm sure we'll see a lot of hoaxes. The stinger missile theory has been all but eliminated but I'm surprised we haven't heard one along the lines of "Osama Bin Laden shot it down with a satellite". People will do weird stuff to get attention. Look at the scum trying to sell pieces on Ebay.

              It's very sad what happened and a great loss. The only good thing; I think it probably all happened so fast, the crew had little or no idea of it and didn't suffer. Their last thoughts were probably pleasant, thinking of seeing their families and such.

              Columbia was the only shuttle that could not dock with the space station. It did not have the robotic arm aboard. They were packed full. I saw a pre-flight interview with Michael Anderson. He said he was only taking a notebook and pencils as personal items because space was limited with all the experiments they had going.

              Hopefully they'll find the answer and it can be prevented in the future. Personally, I wonder if the cold launch temps had anything to do with it. Temperature differences can mean a lot and the Challenger failed because low temps affected O rings.

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              • #22
                It's very sad what happened and a great loss. The only good thing; I think it probably all happened so fast, the crew had little or no idea of it and didn't suffer. Their last thoughts were probably pleasant, thinking of seeing their families and such.
                actually from what I've heard on CNN, they've said that the crew was most likely alive during much of the descent, and did not die instantly. Horrible..
                website: joe.pcfx.cc
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                • #23
                  The orbiter does not need to 'dock' to perform a crew transfer.
                  1. Don Suits.
                  2. Vent atmosphere.
                  3. Open hatch.
                  4. Go EVA.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Mr. X
                    actually from what I've heard on CNN, they've said that the crew was most likely alive during much of the descent, and did not die instantly. Horrible..
                    Don't believe everything you hear on CNN.
                    --filburt1, vBulletin.org/vBulletinTemplates.com moderator
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                    • #25
                      A shuttle costs approximately 15 BILLION to make Filbert. I'd like to see you cough up that much.

                      Next thing now best to do is scrap the current design of the shuttle, and build a brand new one from the ground up. The current design didn't have enough failsafes just in case something happened.
                      ManagerJosh, Owner of 4 XenForo Licenses, 1 vBulletin Legacy License, 1 Internet Brands Suite License
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                      • #26
                        They're already working with new designs with the intention to retire the fleet.
                        --filburt1, vBulletin.org/vBulletinTemplates.com moderator
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                        • #27
                          Kier could design one in LightWave.
                          "63,000 bugs in the code, 63,000 bugs, you get 1 whacked with a service pack, now there's 63,005 bugs in the code."
                          "Before you critisize someone, walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you critisize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes."
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                          • #28
                            i just seen some more pictures on the news and that scratch is not there! that has been tampered with although that dint was there but NASA claim its very unlicky this was the cause od the accident and they are also blamming it on lack of money etc now

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by ManagerJosh
                              A shuttle costs approximately 15 BILLION to make Filbert. I'd like to see you cough up that much.

                              Next thing now best to do is scrap the current design of the shuttle, and build a brand new one from the ground up. The current design didn't have enough failsafes just in case something happened.
                              You also have to take into account that the current shuttle fleet was designed in the 1970s. The Enterprise which was the test plane, came off the production line in 1977.

                              Personally, I hope they replace them with a version of the Venture prototype by Lockheed or at least incorporate some of its design innovations in the next prototype. New shuttles shouldn't cost as much as the current fleet though because research and development has been paid off and the facilities still exist (there is a $20 billion hanger about 5 miles from my house) to build the shuttles in, as well as a trained and able workcrew that could be called in to complete the work.

                              With the advances in graphite construction over the last 30 years, newer vehicles will not only be more reliable and safe but will cost less and be lighter as well.
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                              • #30
                                The new Lockheed Martin ones are also completely reusable IIRC; no external fuel tank or SRBs
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