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  • CPU Temp - Should I Be Concerned?

    My CPU currently reads a temperature of 161 (F) degrees. Should I be concerned about this temp?
    "63,000 bugs in the code, 63,000 bugs, you get 1 whacked with a service pack, now there's 63,005 bugs in the code."
    "Before you critisize someone, walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you critisize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes."
    Utopia Software - Current Software: Utopia News Pro (news management system)

  • #2
    Amd? What fan?


    And yes your PC should run at 40-50 C
    Running vB since 4-14-2002

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    • #3
      Originally posted by IDN
      Amd? What fan?


      And yes your PC should run at 40-50 C
      Intel P4, some fan from CompUSA. Jeez, so I should definetly power down then eh and wait to get a better fan before I permanently damage proc?
      "63,000 bugs in the code, 63,000 bugs, you get 1 whacked with a service pack, now there's 63,005 bugs in the code."
      "Before you critisize someone, walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you critisize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes."
      Utopia Software - Current Software: Utopia News Pro (news management system)

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      • #4
        No. It's impossible to damage a P4 by overheating.

        People have even pulled off their heatsinks before and the chip runs fine.

        Why? Thermal throttling. Once the CPU reaches a certain "danger temperature", it will automatically clock down to a speed where it can run without a HSF, sometimes as low as 100-200MHz. For instance, during Quake3, a test was run. Video went from 100FPS to .5FPS with HSF removed, it was placed back on, and five seconds later the processor was fine.

        71.7C, however, is INSANELY hot. I wouldn't be surprised if your processor is already throttling down below its rated speed.

        Few questions.

        1. What HSF are you using? Intel Stock? That would be your best option. The standard Intel P4 HSF's that are included with most P4's cool VERY well.
        2. What fan, and how many CFM is it rated for? If you can provide a model number I can get the info for you.
        3. is the fan RUNNING? check to make sure
        4. Touch the side of the heatsink with a finger... does it burn? Some motherboards read temperatures irregularly high, and thus the number may be incorrect. (and no, you won't burn your finger off. i've done it before, and just remember to take it off quickly).
        5. Are you using thermal grease? Because you need to. At least that or a TIM. Today's processors simply will burn up, real fast, without thermal paste of some sort. Most new HSF's come with a TIM on the bottom, or thermal interface material, usually a colored "pad" that melts into the processor. This will do the trick, but it is ONE TIME ONLY. If you apply it, take it off, and put it back up again, you risk severe damage. After that point you need to clean the processor and scrape the rest of the TIM off of the heatsink.

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        • #5
          I don't have the Intel stock HSF.

          The fan is made to support up to 2.4 GHz, this CPU runs at 1.78 GHz.

          The fan is running, and spinning at 4272 RPM.

          The heatsink is relatively warm, doesn't burn at all, even when finger is left on it.

          I just bought some heatsink grease stuff. More on this below.*

          I checked the BIOS, and it reads the CPU temp at 42 (C) degrees. Should I assume that the checker I used through Windows is wrong, or does the processor heat up that drastically after loading Windows?

          * I just bought that heatsink grease stuff, but how does one put it on? Does it go on the heatsink or the processor? When you put it on the heatsink (assuming it goes directly on the heatsink, and indirectly onto the processor), do you place the heatsink back onto the processor right after doing so, or wait until it's dry, or what? When you put it on the processor (assuming it goes directly onto the processor, and indirectly onto the heatsink), do you put the heatsink back onto the processor right after doing so, or wait until the stuff is dry on the processor and then place it on?
          "63,000 bugs in the code, 63,000 bugs, you get 1 whacked with a service pack, now there's 63,005 bugs in the code."
          "Before you critisize someone, walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you critisize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes."
          Utopia Software - Current Software: Utopia News Pro (news management system)

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          • #6
            Use a solvent to clean any grease and any existing thermal pad off of the base of the heatsink. Take care not to score the underside.
            Dry thoroughly.
            Apply thin layer of thermal compound to CPU core.
            Spread using only plastic implement such as modeling tools or disposable cutlery. Do NOT use serrated edge and do NOT apply excessive pressure.
            Reinstall heatsink immediately so as to allow thermal compound to mold itself into any imperfections in the heatsink's base.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by <v>
              Use a solvent to clean any grease and any existing thermal pad off of the base of the heatsink. Take care not to score the underside.
              Dry thoroughly.
              Apply thin layer of thermal compound to CPU core.
              Spread using only plastic implement such as modeling tools or disposable cutlery. Do NOT use serrated edge and do NOT apply excessive pressure.
              Reinstall heatsink immediately so as to allow thermal compound to mold itself into any imperfections in the heatsink's base.
              Ok, so it goes onto the CPU first? By CPU core, I assume you mean on top?

              The existing stuff that was ontop is already gone.
              "63,000 bugs in the code, 63,000 bugs, you get 1 whacked with a service pack, now there's 63,005 bugs in the code."
              "Before you critisize someone, walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you critisize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes."
              Utopia Software - Current Software: Utopia News Pro (news management system)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by CeleronXT
                Ok, so it goes onto the CPU first? By CPU core, I assume you mean on top?

                The existing stuff that was ontop is already gone.
                The core is the domed slug in the centre of the CPU
                If the CPU has a spreader plate, apply to the plate

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                • #9
                  I used to have AMD because they were cheap and performing great. But I had 2 fans in the front and 2 in the back, and thermaltake superorb on top of the bastard cpu. It was 60 degrees and 65 to 70 during games, on the EDGE!

                  Now I have a nice p4 2.4 ghz with 1 fan in front and 1 in the back at lowest rpm and the fan on top of the cpu which came with the cpu. It is between 20/25 c normal and 30/35 stressed. If it goes over 40 degrees, the fans make bigger rpms

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                  • #10
                    I checked the BIOS, and it reads the CPU temp at 42 (C) degrees. Should I assume that the checker I used through Windows is wrong, or does the processor heat up that drastically after loading Windows?
                    ^^Something I posted before, but never got an answer to, though I'd like to.
                    "63,000 bugs in the code, 63,000 bugs, you get 1 whacked with a service pack, now there's 63,005 bugs in the code."
                    "Before you critisize someone, walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you critisize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes."
                    Utopia Software - Current Software: Utopia News Pro (news management system)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by xiphoid
                      I used to have AMD because they were cheap and performing great. But I had 2 fans in the front and 2 in the back, and thermaltake superorb on top of the bastard cpu. It was 60 degrees and 65 to 70 during games, on the EDGE!

                      Now I have a nice p4 2.4 ghz with 1 fan in front and 1 in the back at lowest rpm and the fan on top of the cpu which came with the cpu. It is between 20/25 c normal and 30/35 stressed. If it goes over 40 degrees, the fans make bigger rpms
                      Tell me about it.
                      I have so far stuck with AMD too.
                      Most of my boxes run with Durons. 1.1GHz or 1.3GHz
                      The Only box I built with power in mind was my movie-station and, don't laugh, runs an Athlon T-Bird 1.2GHz. (was the most powerful at the time)
                      Now that li'l bugger runs HOT!
                      As soon as I can afford it I'm going PIV for sure.

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                      • #12
                        That reading was crap. If it didnt burn your finger at all, it aint 71C. 42 sounds about right with the specs you listed, even without TIM/grease.

                        You're fine.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by NetherChris
                          That reading was crap. If it didnt burn your finger at all, it aint 71C. 42 sounds about right with the specs you listed, even without TIM/grease.

                          You're fine.
                          Really? Sweet. ^_^

                          Kicks hmonitor.

                          Hah.. I just realized this temp monitor also displays the second CPU at 105.8 (F) degrees.... I don't have a second CPU. @[email protected]

                          EDIT: Think if I add grease/TIM I can overclock it a bit? ^_^
                          "63,000 bugs in the code, 63,000 bugs, you get 1 whacked with a service pack, now there's 63,005 bugs in the code."
                          "Before you critisize someone, walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you critisize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes."
                          Utopia Software - Current Software: Utopia News Pro (news management system)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You could.. but i'd recommend more experience in general before you do. Just gradually raise the frontside bus. The problem is, unless you have a decent mobo, it will pull the PCI/AGP buses out of spec, and things like that, which is why I'd say get a little more experience first.

                            No harm in trying, though.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by NetherChris
                              You could.. but i'd recommend more experience in general before you do. Just gradually raise the frontside bus. The problem is, unless you have a decent mobo, it will pull the PCI/AGP buses out of spec, and things like that, which is why I'd say get a little more experience first.

                              No harm in trying, though.
                              I've been reading guides on it, and so far what I've gotten is 1.6 GHz to 1.78 GHz with no temperature change, and I still don't have the grease in place.... I believe the motherboard is at least decent.. it's this one http://www.soyousa.com/products/proddesc.php?id=7 .
                              "63,000 bugs in the code, 63,000 bugs, you get 1 whacked with a service pack, now there's 63,005 bugs in the code."
                              "Before you critisize someone, walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you critisize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes."
                              Utopia Software - Current Software: Utopia News Pro (news management system)

                              Comment

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