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  • The word "brat".

    I could have sworn it was spelled "bradt" but I looked it up on dictionary.com and it doesn't exist. I guess my mind is playing tricks on me.

    I'm making this post to ask you if the word "brat" was ever spelled "bradt".
    Most of you will say "The spelling on 'bradt' doesn't make any since" and I agree but also remember the spelling on the word "knife" doesn't make any sense.

  • #2
    Originally posted by harmor View Post
    Most of you will say "The spelling on 'bradt' doesn't make any since" and I agree but also remember the spelling on the word "knife" doesn't make any sense.
    You don't make any sense.
    selling kawaiiNation.com

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    • #3
      I don't even know what you are talking about.
      That's the end of that!

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      • #4
        Only thing I found on it is that it is Gaelic meaning "badly behaved child", and is spelled brat.

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        • #5
          Brat is the correct spelling. Knife is the correct spelling.

          There are a lot of silent Ks like "Knee" for example. Don't ask me why they are in there, ask an english professor haha.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by harmor View Post
            I could have sworn it was spelled "bradt" but I looked it up on dictionary.com and it doesn't exist. I guess my mind is playing tricks on me.

            I'm making this post to ask you if the word "brat" was ever spelled "bradt".
            Most of you will say "The spelling on 'bradt' doesn't make any since" and I agree but also remember the spelling on the word "knife" doesn't make any sense.
            Some words are spelled differently depending on the country.
            spelled, spelt
            dreamed, dreamt
            brat is not one of them.
            ...steven
            www.318ti.org (vB3.8) | www.nccbmwcca.org (vB4.2)
            bmwcca.org/forum | m135i.net
            "I tried to clean this up but this thread is beyond redemption." - Steve Machol

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 1996 328ti View Post
              Some words are spelled differently depending on the country.
              spelled, spelt
              dreamed, dreamt
              brat is not one of them.
              Well, seeing as how English didn't have any standard for quite a while. We can be thankful that those are the only discrepancies we still have; and even then it's only due to differences in standardizations (or standardisations?) between separate countries. So they're still correct.

              As for knife/knight/knit, the k actually was originally pronounced in English and other languages. So knight would be pronounced knaɪt.

              Language study is a fun thing

              Also, as far as I know, brat has always been brat without a d. I even checked:

              brat
              c.1505, slang, "beggar's child," originally northern, midlands and western England dialect "makeshift or ragged garment," probably the same word as O.E. bratt "cloak," from a Celtic source (cf. O.Ir. bratt "cloak, cloth"). The modern meaning is perhaps from notion of "child's apron." Bratty is first recorded 1961.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chousho View Post
                Well, seeing as how English didn't have any standard for quite a while. We can be thankful that those are the only discrepancies we still have; and even then it's only due to differences in standardizations (or standardisations?) between separate countries. So they're still correct.
                I didn't mean to imply that either were incorrect.
                ...steven
                www.318ti.org (vB3.8) | www.nccbmwcca.org (vB4.2)
                bmwcca.org/forum | m135i.net
                "I tried to clean this up but this thread is beyond redemption." - Steve Machol

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                • #9
                  This thread is meaningless. There are several online dictionaries that accompany each word definition with a vocal pronunciation. You could have looked it up on one of these and spared everyone's time!

                  Just my two cents (or pennies)!
                  You're spending millions of dollars on a website?!

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                  • #10
                    If those who replied thought it was a waste of time to do so, they would not have replied. People have replied, so it was obviously not a waste to them.

                    Why did you bother replying if you thought it was a waste of time?

                    FYI, I enjoy finding out where words originated from, and enjoy these types of threads. Contrary to what you believe, the internet is not all knowing.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by harmor View Post
                      I could have sworn it was spelled "bradt" but I looked it up on dictionary.com and it doesn't exist. I guess my mind is playing tricks on me.

                      I'm making this post to ask you if the word "brat" was ever spelled "bradt".
                      Most of you will say "The spelling on 'bradt' doesn't make any since" and I agree but also remember the spelling on the word "knife" doesn't make any sense.
                      Who cares? Really you are a brat for asking this pedantic question.
                      Aussiefootyforums

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                      Come and talk sports all day long


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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by hawksgirl View Post
                        Who cares? Really you are a brat for asking this pedantic question.
                        Good one.

                        pe⋅dan⋅tic

                           /pəˈdæntɪk/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [puh-dan-tik] Show IPA Pronunciation
                        –adjective 1. ostentatious in one's learning. 2. overly concerned with minute details or formalisms, esp. in teaching.


                        os⋅ten⋅ta⋅tious

                           /ˌɒstɛnˈteɪʃəs, -tən-/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [os-ten-tey-shuhs, -tuhn-] Show IPA Pronunciation
                        –adjective 1. characterized by or given to pretentious or conspicuous show in an attempt to impress others: an ostentatious dresser. 2. (of actions, manner, qualities exhibited, etc.) intended to attract notice: Lady Bountiful's ostentatious charity.
                        ...steven
                        www.318ti.org (vB3.8) | www.nccbmwcca.org (vB4.2)
                        bmwcca.org/forum | m135i.net
                        "I tried to clean this up but this thread is beyond redemption." - Steve Machol

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DoE
                          If those who replied thought it was a waste of time to do so, they would not have replied. People have replied, so it was obviously not a waste to them.

                          Why did you bother replying if you thought it was a waste of time?

                          FYI, I enjoy finding out where words originated from, and enjoy these types of threads. Contrary to what you believe, the internet is not all knowing.
                          Well, I didn't say it is "a waste of time". Reread my post. I clearly stated that he could have found everything he wants about the word if he did a little bit research on a specialized website (it exists on Dictionary.com), and thus, no one would need to answer a trivial question, which is about "knowing" by the way.

                          If I came about rude to you or others then I apologize, however, I'm still on my stance about the thread.
                          You're spending millions of dollars on a website?!

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                          • #14
                            Well the word "Brat" means a misbehaved child, that is considered to be rude/obnonctious (God knows how to spell it) the other word you mentioned "bradt" isnt even a real word, probably one in another language, but my main and only language is
                            "anglais". (English)
                            Jut a random internet person.

                            A message to all illegal users!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Are so many people acting like Brats in this thread just to be ironic?

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