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  • #16
    Thanks guys. My favorite was #2 but I wasn't sure.
    That's the end of that!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Floris View Post
      The most common?
      The best comment?
      Well, I was on the way out the door.


      Glad we could help MrNase.
      Congratulations on the death of vBulletin, Internet Brands.

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      • #18
        "vBulletin.com, your source for forum-software and grammar".
        Toddler from Hell

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        • #19
          this sounds great!

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          • #20
            You know, while we're on the subject~

            I've always wondered which accent non-English speakers have found the easiest to understand. While I think the standard English learned is usually the Queen's, to me, anyway, it seems the general American accent is a bit plainer in speech and might be easier to understand.

            So which is easier to understand? Which was easier when you were still learning?

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            • #21
              All going to be relative to where you learnt English, what media (TV, Music, etc) you experience and if it's your native language, I would of thought.

              The Queen's (Received Pronunciation (RP))isn't typically the one learnt as it's rarely spoken that well, though when it is, the pronunciation is sharper than most so easier to decipher I'd think.

              Though if you are an immigrant to ...... Texas or Georgia (i.e. a place that has a distinctive accent) and learn the local dialect and accent there, while learning English, someone akin to me is going to sound very strange, even though I'm speaking what would be regarded the more correct English (and accent).

              Which again all depends on where you are and the context, lots of variables to consider.
              I wrote ImpEx.

              Blog | Me

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              • #22
                Well, sometimes even people who speak English can't understand each other because of the accent, regardless if it's their first language or not. Some people can't understand the English if you speak with a strong southern accent, from Australia, or from the UK (although that last one, it also causes confusion because of the dialect/vocabulary).

                I think when it comes to understanding English here, it's also difficult to perfect because of how "flexible" the language is. You can say one thing different times, and still be correct, but yet at others you have to remember to keep track of the constant changes when speaking (especially in long sentences).

                I think I had read somewhere a while ago, although it might not be the case now, that English here was probably one of the hardest to pick up and understand.
                Congratulations on the death of vBulletin, Internet Brands.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Onimua View Post
                  if you speak with a strong southern accent, from Australia, or from the UK (although that last one, it also causes confusion because of the dialect/vocabulary).
                  That's relative to you though (and you are talking about the country of origin being the harder one to understand!). As an example during the colonies in India a much more British English would of be taught so British would of been much more comprehendible to people who learnt that way, than American would of.

                  All depends on where, what and how you learn.
                  I wrote ImpEx.

                  Blog | Me

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                  • #24
                    Well, yes, but I meant it as an in-general thing. Probably should've worded it that way, but I was talking from my perspective.

                    Of course your ability to understand what people say depends on where you learned it, and what you've been exposed to. Still though, even if you know "english" and meet other people who do, it doesn't mean you'd actually understand them if you don't get their accent.

                    On an off-shoot, I've been thinking of learning Japanese... my sister knows Chinese and Italian (and a couple more), but I want to pick up a couple of other languages. :P Then I can read manga from Japan for real...
                    Congratulations on the death of vBulletin, Internet Brands.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Onimua View Post
                      Then I can read manga from Japan for real...
                      Worth it for that alone.
                      I wrote ImpEx.

                      Blog | Me

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Onimua View Post
                        On an off-shoot, I've been thinking of learning Japanese... my sister knows Chinese and Italian (and a couple more), but I want to pick up a couple of other languages. :P Then I can read manga from Japan for real...
                        When you say your sister knows Chinese, I'm assuming you refer to Mandarin? I actually prefer Cantonese over Mando, but that's mostly because I grew up watching Kung Fu movies with my dad, and HK films are generally more comedy based, as mainland ones are a little dryer (I think, anyway).

                        If your sister tries to pick up Japanese, she would have a bit of an advantage over you, too. A lot of the other kids in my Japanese class were Chinese and did quite well, along with some of my other Korean friends. Since Japanese and Korea both borrowed a lot from China, the two are a bit easy to pick up if you know the one or other. Even then, however, you have to remember that neither language is related or that close, it's just that they've borrowed so much from each other (in regards to China, Japan and Korea, although there's debate between the latter two).
                        Originally posted by Jerry View Post
                        Worth it for that alone.
                        Haha, indeed.

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                        • #27
                          Me, as an Arabic. I'm practicing listening for various accents.

                          As for the American accent, you can see movies, TV Shows. Lost, Grey's Anatomy and Dr.Phil .. etc.

                          For the British accent, BBC is the best source, I assume.

                          For the Australian accent, I listened to it once over the internet, and it wasn't that bad and difficult.

                          For Chinese accent see CCTV9.

                          For various accent (Asian and African) from around the world, see Al Jazeera International (which is way better than the Arabic version! as the last one helps spreading terrorism. point of view!).

                          Also you have the Irish, southern African and NZ accents

                          The most easiest and funniest English to me is the one which is spoken by Arabs and nearest ME countries in general, because they almost pronounce letters the same way I do.

                          But I do like the American accent, I watched the last union speech of president Bush. and I understood it completely. I wish I could speak this accent.

                          I do like the British accent too, but it doesn't seem to be that easy.

                          English is very important to me, as I intend to take the IELTS and immigrate to Australia.

                          Finally, the easiest one is the one you've practiced.

                          Best regards
                          Last edited by Milado; Thu 24 Apr '08, 2:54pm.
                          Syrian Medical Society - mi la do - My Hacks - vCharset converter - Projects Queue

                          I want to breathe the freedom, and to strew the mounts of nostalgia in your eyes.

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                          • #28
                            I've never been to the US and A but I watch a lot of american shows like American Chopper (Mikey for President ) or American Hotrod (R.I.P. Boyd Coddington ) so I am used to their accent and besides some unknown words I have no problems to understand the language.

                            However, I've been to England several times (London and the surrounding area) and I found it rather hard to understand the Brits.

                            In school I was tought English but by hanging around at vb.com I soon started to write in American English (railroad station instead of railway station, movie theater instead of cinema, truck instead of lorry) and my teachers got upset and they told me to write what they called 'clean' English instead.

                            I recently met someone from New Zealand - that's some crazy English.
                            That's the end of that!

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by MrNase View Post
                              [snip]I've never been to the US of A [/snip]
                              If you try going to the US and A, you might end up in a different place entirely. Unless of course you mean the U.S. and the Americas.
                              Congratulations on the death of vBulletin, Internet Brands.

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                              • #30
                                Sorry, small typo. US and A of course.
                                That's the end of that!

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