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Should smoking be banned altogether?

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  • briansol
    replied
    you dont like my smoke, i don't like you're BO and bad breathe.

    until we can stop you from smelling, you can't stop smokers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Creepshow
    replied
    Originally posted by whitetigergrowl View Post
    What else would you consider it? Water skiing?
    You've totally missed the point I was making haven't you?

    Leave a comment:


  • Creepshow
    replied
    Originally posted by whitetigergrowl View Post
    At what point did I say if you were or weren't? Oh yeah, I never did!
    You implied I was by posting all that anti-smoking information in a reply to one of my posts.

    Leave a comment:


  • whitetigergrowl
    replied
    Originally posted by Creepshow View Post
    Right, so by that logic, if I go snowboarding while on holiday - that makes me a snowboarder, does it?
    What else would you consider it? Water skiing?

    Leave a comment:


  • Creepshow
    replied
    Originally posted by whitetigergrowl View Post
    A smoker is a smoker. Plain and simple. It doesn't mean you are a heavy smoker or a casual smoker. But you are a smoker none-the-less. You can't constitute yourself a non-smoker. So common sense dictates you are a smoker. Regardless of how often you do it. If someone only rapes someone once every 3 months or so does that make them a non-rapist? Or if they smoke 1 doobie every 3 or so months does that mean they don't do drugs? Nope. Nice way to try and put some spin on it.
    Right, so by that logic, if I go snowboarding while on holiday - that makes me a snowboarder, does it?

    Leave a comment:


  • whitetigergrowl
    replied
    Originally posted by Creepshow View Post
    whitetigergrowl, if you had read the thread properly, you would know I am not a smoker as such.

    Now who's the ignorant one.
    At what point did I say if you were or weren't? Oh yeah, I never did!

    Originally posted by Creepshow View Post
    Your brain cells are weak at best.
    As is your argument.

    Originally posted by Creepshow View Post
    I smoke one cigarette maybe every two months or so.

    To me, that does not constitute a 'smoker'.
    A smoker is a smoker. Plain and simple. It doesn't mean you are a heavy smoker or a casual smoker. But you are a smoker none-the-less. You can't constitute yourself a non-smoker. So common sense dictates you are a smoker. Regardless of how often you do it. If someone only rapes someone once every 3 months or so does that make them a non-rapist? Or if they smoke 1 doobie every 3 or so months does that mean they don't do drugs? Nope. Nice way to try and put some spin on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • MRGTB
    replied
    Yeah, I see what you mean. But you still smoke!

    Leave a comment:


  • Creepshow
    replied
    Originally posted by MRGTB View Post
    No offence, but what is "I'm not a smoker as such". You either smoke, or you don't!

    There's no such thing as I'm not a smoker as such, and that seem to imply that you smoke every now and then. Which makes you a smoker. All be it a part time smoker
    I smoke one cigarette maybe every two months or so.

    To me, that does not constitute a 'smoker'.

    Leave a comment:


  • MRGTB
    replied
    Originally posted by Creepshow View Post
    whitetigergrowl, if you had read the thread properly, you would know I am not a smoker as such.

    Now who's the ignorant one.
    No offence, but what is "I'm not a smoker as such". You either smoke, or you don't!

    There's no such thing as I'm not a smoker as such, and that seem to imply that you smoke every now and then. Which makes you a smoker. All be it a part time smoker

    Leave a comment:


  • Creepshow
    replied
    Originally posted by Dilly View Post
    Ok. Assault should be legal. I should be able to walk up to someone and punch them in the head. I mean, it won't kill them straight away, but it will harm them - the same as smoke.

    Your arguement is weak at best.
    Your brain cells are weak at best.

    Leave a comment:


  • Creepshow
    replied
    whitetigergrowl, if you had read the thread properly, you would know I am not a smoker as such.

    Now who's the ignorant one.

    Leave a comment:


  • whitetigergrowl
    replied
    Originally posted by Creepshow View Post
    In that case you're being extremely ignorant.

    Who are you to say smoking is wrong?
    Originally posted by Creepshow View Post
    Yeah, because smoking is equivelent to murdering someone.

    "lol"
    Ignorance is bliss isn't it? Look it up, it's damn close. If you wanna kill yourself over a dried up plant and a bunch of chemicals. Go for it. But I shouldn't have to be subjected in public to your ignorance OR choice which DOES affect me. What do you think second hand smoke is? That crap sticks to everything too. I would like to thank the Mayo Clinic for the following info below on secondhand smoke. And I shouldn't have to keep moving around because you feel too self centered to temporarily hang up the cigarette because of your flat out addiction to it.

    If you are a smoker you can kill yourself with your cigarettes and continue to slave over your addiction. That's your choice. But it's NOT my choice to have to deal with your ignorance and addictions in public AND to have them affect me or my health in such negative ways. Read on....
    ---------------------------------------------------

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sec...-smoke/CC00023

    Secondhand smoke: Avoid dangers in the air you breathe

    Breathing in the toxins in secondhand smoke can cause a variety of health problems, including lung cancer and asthma. Understand more and see how to avoid the dangers.

    You don't smoke because you understand the dangers. But what about that thick cloud hanging in the air at your favorite restaurant? What about the haze left behind after your guests have departed after a night of partying? And what about the cigarette your spouse has left burning in an ashtray just a few feet away from your infant?

    Are they all a danger, too?

    Yes, they are. Compelling evidence indicates that secondhand smoke is a health hazard. And it's nearly as bad as smoking itself. Rich in toxic chemicals, secondhand smoke may play a role in causing or contributing to a number of health problems, from cardiovascular disease to cancer.
    But secondhand smoke is often avoidable. Take steps to safeguard yourself and your loved ones from secondhand smoke.

    Toxins in secondhand smoke



    What exactly is secondhand smoke? It's two different forms of smoke from cigarettes, pipes or cigars:
    • Sidestream smoke. This is smoke that wafts from the burning tobacco product.
    • Mainstream smoke. This is smoke that the smoker exhales.
    Secondhand smoke is also known as environmental tobacco smoke, passive smoking, involuntary smoking and a newer, more descriptive term, tobacco smoke pollution.

    Regardless of what you call it, both types of secondhand smoke contain harmful chemicals — and a lot of them. Specifically which chemicals are present depend on the type of tobacco product, how it's smoked and the paper in which the tobacco is wrapped. More than 4,000 chemicals make up the haze of secondhand smoke. And more than 60 of the chemicals in cigarette smoke are known to be carcinogenic, which means they may cause cancer.

    Some of the substances found in secondhand smoke that are known or suspected to cause cancer include:
    • Formaldehyde
    • Arsenic
    • Cadmium
    • Benzene
    • Ethylene oxide
    Here are a few other chemicals in secondhand smoke that might sound familiar, along with their effects on health:
    • Ammonia — irritates your lungs
    • Carbon monoxide — hampers breathing by reducing oxygen in your blood
    • Methanol — toxic when inhaled or swallowed
    • Hydrogen cyanide — interferes with proper respiratory function
    The dangerous particles given off in secondhand smoke can linger in the air for hours. Even breathing them in for a short time — as little as 20 or 30 minutes — can harm your health in a variety ways. And breathing in secondhand smoke over years can be all the more dangerous.

    Adult health threats from secondhand smoke

    Health experts have recognized the relationship between secondhand smoke and health risks for decades. Research exploring these connections is ongoing.

    Some of the known or suspected health risks include:

    Cancer

    In 1993, the Environmental Protection Agency placed environmental tobacco smoke in the most dangerous category of cancer-causing agents, and subsequent research has upheld that status.

    Secondhand smoke is a known risk factor for lung cancer. Experts believe that secondhand smoke is to blame for roughly 3,000 deaths from lung cancer in adult nonsmokers each year in the United States. Secondhand smoke is also linked to cancer of the nasal sinuses. It's also been linked to cancers of the cervix, breast and bladder, but the evidence hasn't been as compelling as the link to lung cancer.

    Heart disease

    Secondhand smoke harms the cardiovascular system of nonsmokers in many ways. For one thing, it causes coronary heart disease, such as a heart attack. It also damages blood vessels, interferes with circulation and increases the risk of blood clots. It's estimated that some 35,000 nonsmokers die of smoking-related heart disease in the United States every year.

    Lung disease

    Chronic lung ailments, such as bronchitis and asthma, have been associated with secondhand smoke. Exposure to secondhand smoke is also associated with chest tightness at night and feelings of breathlessness after physical activity.

    Children's health threats from secondhand smoke

    Secondhand smoke has a marked effect on the health of infants and children. They're more vulnerable than adults because they're still developing physically and generally have higher breathing rates, which means they may inhale greater quantities of secondhand smoke than do adults.

    For children who live in households where someone smokes, the effects are worst during the child's first five years, since the child may spend the bulk of that time with a smoking parent or guardian. Ironically, infants are at the highest risk of secondhand smoke from their own mothers. A child who spends just one hour in a very smoky room is inhaling as many dangerous chemicals as if he or she smoked 10 or more cigarettes.

    Here's a look at some of the main health problems in infants and children associated with secondhand smoke.

    Growth and development

    Women who are exposed to secondhand smoke during pregnancy are at higher risk of having babies of slightly lower birth weight. This can cause a host of health problems for the baby, such as cerebral palsy or learning disabilities. Women who actively smoke during pregnancy expose their developing baby to passive smoke — the chemicals may pass through the placenta — and put them at risk of lower birth weight. Scientists are studying the link between secondhand smoke and growth delays and congenital malformations.

    A developing fetus exposed to secondhand smoke may also be at an increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). But evidence that post-birth exposure to secondhand smoke increases the risk of SIDS is inconclusive.

    Asthma and other respiratory problems

    Secondhand smoke may cause asthma in children. In children who already have asthma, secondhand smoke can make episodes more frequent and more severe.

    Secondhand smoke is also tied to lower respiratory infections, such as bronchitis and pneumonia, especially in those younger than 6. It's also associated with irritation of the upper respiratory tract and a small reduction in lung function.

    Middle ear conditions

    Children living in households with smokers are more likely to have a buildup of fluid in their middle ear, which is an indication of chronic middle ear disease (otitis media).


    MORE ON THIS TOPIC


    Other health problems related to secondhand smoke


    For both adults and children, secondhand smoke is linked to a variety of other health problems, including:
    • Chronic coughing, phlegm and wheezing
    • Eye and nose irritation
    • Reduced lung function
    • Irritability and annoyance
    • Dental cavities
    ------------------------------------------------------------------ End

    So go ahead, enjoy your poison. Just don't make me a part of your 'choice' in public. Since it is a choice that affects me and many others in a very negative way.
    Last edited by whitetigergrowl; Mon 14 Jan '08, 11:58am.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mez
    replied
    *sighs* The old smoking debate. Really, it's boring.

    Let me lay down a few things as it stands here in the UK at the moment (which I believe is what the question was regarding)

    At the moment, it is illegal to smoke anywhere in the UK in a "confined public space"

    This means anywhere with a ceiling and more than 50% walls surrounding it. This includes Stuff like bus shelters.

    The reason for this?

    Well, you can find out here ... http://www.smokefreeengland.co.uk/wh...dividuals.html

    I am personally a smoker currently, however, this has only been for the past few years. Previous to that, I used to work in smoky bars, casino's etc etc. I knew that in this job, I'd be exposed to smoke, etc etc. No I do not think this is the reason that I started smoking, I know why I did, and why did I work in these places? because I knew, as an employee, I had recompense from the company if I were to ever develop any smoking related illnesses. Being subjected to that constant stream of smoke, while a health risk, was one I was willing to take.

    I am a considerate smoker, I'll always ask if anyone minds me smoking, I'll head out of the way of other people if I know there are non-smokers around, I won't smoke in the presence of children, or other frail people (pregnant women for example). I try to be kind and curteous.

    I know smoking is bad for me, and for others, which is why I do these things, but I don't see myself stopping if it became illegal. In fact, I believe that making smoking illegal would cause a huge drain for the police to enforce such a law, and create a black market for tobbacco, just as there are for other drugs currently.

    Also, to the OP

    If people wish to cause harm to themselves, then that's entirely their problem in my opinion. But given that smoking is harmful and is not essential (unlike transport)
    What about alcohol? what about many other things. You could apply the same logic to a lot of things, but it depends on your definition of "essential"

    Why is transport essential - you have legs - don't you?

    Leave a comment:


  • MRGTB
    replied
    Voted No

    Reason - "Freedom of choice"

    What gives a none smoker the right to tell a smoker he can't smoke. It's none of his business! Maybe I should tell fat people they can't eat for a month. And see what kind of response that gets. Or tell half the internet junkies here they can't use the web for a year.
    Last edited by MRGTB; Mon 14 Jan '08, 9:00am.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dilly
    replied
    Ok. Assault should be legal. I should be able to walk up to someone and punch them in the head. I mean, it won't kill them straight away, but it will harm them - the same as smoke.

    Your arguement is weak at best.

    Leave a comment:

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