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  • vBulletin History

    In 1999 James Limm and John Percival were running a Visual Basic website using Infopop's UBB.classic forum software on VB Forums. As their site grew, they noticed that their software, written in Perl using a flat-file database, could not always cope with the number of users they had. In February of 2000, the two decided that it would be better to write their own solution as both were unfamiliar with the software's code and thus unable to optimize it. Initially, it was designed solely as a rewrite of UBB, but in PHP using MySQL, and was meant only for their forum. However, a few months later, other UBB owners expressed interest in the solution. Because of this, they offered to sell it to Infopop, but their proposal was rejected. As there was still a demand for the software, Limm and Percival created Jelsoft and released their work as a paid solution, thus becoming vBulletin 1.

    After subsequent minor releases of their software, the two decided to start working on a new version that would be more than a rewrite of UBB: they wanted to turn their software into a competitive solution for forums. Rewriting the entirety of the product, vBulletin 2 commenced development. Shortly thereafter, Limm became the managing director and Percival the lead developer. To help with the scale of the project, two additional developers, Freddie Bingham and Mike Sullivan were brought on to help finish vBulletin 2. Kier Darby was brought on during the vBulletin 2.0 Beta phase to further development. The release of vBulletin 2 proved to be very successful and is what made vBulletin popular.

    In December of 2002, vBulletin 3 was beginning development. Percival decided to step down as lead developer and product manager, turning his roles over to Kier Darby. vBulletin 3 was under development for a lengthy period of time—nearly 2 years—as it went from a mere improvement on vBulletin 2 to a complete rewrite. However, version 3 was finally released in March 2004. In 2005, vBulletin 3.5 was released that addressed some of the shortcomings of 3.0 (discussed later on). vBulletin 3.6 was released as a stable version on August 3, 2006.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vbulletin

    =====================================

    So from 3.5 to the first add-on it's been two years. It was said at the time that 3.5 was the version that would make the creation of add-ons possible :P
    Last edited by Dream; Sat 25 Aug '07, 7:28am.
    Radio and TV Player for vBulletin

  • #2
    I believe that is referring to adding hacks at vbulletin.org, as products..
    MCSE, MVP, CCIE
    Microsoft Beta Team

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    • #3
      Not from what I remember.
      Radio and TV Player for vBulletin

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Joe Gronlund View Post
        I believe that is referring to adding hacks at vbulletin.org, as products..
        Yeah, I'm pretty sure you're right.

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        • #5
          Well I'm too lazy to find a quote :P so we'll go with that.
          Radio and TV Player for vBulletin

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Dream View Post
            In 1999 James Limm and John Percival were running a Visual Basic website using Infopop's UBB.classic forum software on VB Forums. As their site grew, they noticed that their software, written in Perl using a flat-file database, could not always cope with the number of users they had. In February of 2000, the two decided that it would be better to write their own solution as both were unfamiliar with the software's code and thus unable to optimize it. Initially, it was designed solely as a rewrite of UBB, but in PHP using MySQL, and was meant only for their forum. :P
            I ve been around a very long time, and remember ubb just starting, and before vb was a name. There was wwwthreads. They were the Top of the class in there day. I for one used them, they gave away the program to anyone for free, even hosted the board for you for free. But as life goes UBB bought the name, thus ubb threads and so many other threads came about on that same core script. gossamerthreads is still thriving but less known today. The script was around five years when ubb took over and everyone grad there copy they were using and expanded on it. Yes the days of the true geeks giving away every thing cause there was so much vertual sand to play with, new things to keep learning.
            1999 and before -
            here is something to explore http://web.archive.org/web/199904271...wmethenet.com/

            another gem found from the old days.
            http://www.gossamer-threads.com/foru...nfopop#p162944

            and look at VB now, Im impressed, very much so.
            Last edited by Jazzyname; Fri 2 Jan '09, 9:17pm. Reason: adding more info

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dream View Post
              Well I'm too lazy to find a quote :P so we'll go with that.
              Talking about this?
              You're spending millions of dollars on a website?!

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              • #8
                the history of Vbulletin
                History of vBulletin
                Dean Clatworthy - Web Developer/Designer

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                • #9
                  holy old topic batman!
                  Radio and TV Player for vBulletin

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                  • #10
                    another oldy but goody

                    an interview from 2002.

                    On sitepoint
                    Interview – John Percival from vBulletin

                    http://www.sitepoint.com/article/john-percival-vbulletin/


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                    • #11
                      LOL I love this post:
                      http://www.vbulletin.com/forum/showp...4&postcount=29

                      too awesome!
                      Meow!

                      Please excuse my bad English.

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                      • #12
                        I've always wondered what the "v" in vBulletin stands for.

                        So now I'm guessing it is a reference to the "visual" part of visual basic? Or am I still off track?

                        Thanks,
                        James
                        If you read it online, it must be true.

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                        • #13
                          It seriously means nothing .. It probably just got picked to create a unique name. My guess is, that the owners had a visual basic forum and wanted a bulletin board software for it, and v... b .... vb forum bulletin .... vbulletin vBulletin ... tada .. A fraction of a second in their mind might have decided on this. They've always said it stands for nothing. And if people wish to think it stands for virtual bulletin or visual bulletin or something else that's fine. Truth is, it probably does stand for nothing. Just a random pick to get a unique name.

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                          • #14
                            Yes I honestly thoguht that the name Vbulliten was linked to the actual software of Visual Basic but when it's put that way it's extremely easy to think of.

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