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Any "oldtimer" internet/forum stories here?

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  • #16
    I got into BBSing at its height (???) in 1993 with a 14.4 modem and then upgraded to a blazing fast 28.8! I always wanted to open a BBS, but never had a spare line and fooled around with renegade bbs. I then discovered Compuserve, which introduced me to the Internet and created a website on geocities.com when they were giving a whopping 1 meg of free space! I then added a remotely hosted forum, a chat room called sneakerchat and eventually moved up to vB!

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    • #17
      60 wpm
      I copy cw at 60wpm. Have the cert from arrl to prove it. You can find me on 40 or 80 just about every night. Look for n9kn sometime.
      I don't own a mic. Fell in love with cw when I was a kid. Got my first license at age of 12, one year upgrade or lose the ticket. Was away from the hobby until I passed the novice exam in 1984. Went from novice to advanced with the idea of going all the way to extra when I spent the day at the Chicago FCC office taking all the code and theory tests. Good thing about the guy giving me the exam is he gave 20wpm after I passed tech because he knew I was going for extra. He said if I passed 20wpm he knew I could pass 13wpm. I passed code an failed theory. Got my cert for code and went back the next month to pass the theory.
      Maybe I'll see you on the bands sometimes.
      Last edited by AWS; Mon 13 Feb '06, 7:26pm.
      Admins Zone - Resources for Forum Administrators

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      • #18
        I copy cw at 60wpm... Please explain this.

        sounds like "I type 60 words per minute and have a cert to prove it. "

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        • #19
          cw = continueous wave.
          Morse code. I copy Morse code at 60 words per minute. This is faster than a person talks. When someone talks to you you hear each word. I hear complete sentences or enough of a sentence to understand what is being said in the code.
          Admins Zone - Resources for Forum Administrators

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          • #20
            I enjoy reading about how you old timers got into all of this. Must have been great times back then, shame I missed it.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by AWS
              cw = continueous wave.
              Morse code. I copy Morse code at 60 words per minute. This is faster than a person talks. When someone talks to you you hear each word. I hear complete sentences or enough of a sentence to understand what is being said in the code.
              Wow!

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Lineman28645
                Curious...when was the internet invented? I was thinking it was invented early 1990's...in that case I'm curious. How could you have been working with forums in the 1980's? I was just wondering, lol.
                The internet was originally supposed to have been a communications network for the USA in case of a Nuclear War. And after the cold war with Russia ended it went public.

                That's the story I've read somewhere anyway. So you could say it was created by the government for the government originally

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Creepshow
                  I'm not so sure this is true, not what I've heard at least. I think I will do some reseach on the subject.
                  Its true, its day one of networking school, you learn who and why the internet was developed for. The internet as we know it today was invented by big business, but its original concepts are and were developed by the US Govt'

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Brad.loo
                    I enjoy reading about how you old timers got into all of this. Must have been great times back then, shame I missed it.
                    It was an interesting time, especially since the general public had no idea about "going online". Today, the computers and internet are almost like an appliance, like a telephone in a way. Back then, it was more like a hobby.

                    I had found a good deal on a 1200 baud modem back in the mid 80s, and while I really had no clue as to what I'd do with it, it wasn't long before I found a few sites to dial into. My joining Compuserve came shortly after that, but while I'd been signed up for a couple of years, I never really discovered the forums, or knew what they were about. Since I installed a Novell network at work, and a few DOS apps, I encountered a printing problem, and discovered that I could actually post a question and get a response from someone in something called a "forum"!

                    Because I didn't have too much to do on my new computer back then, I started playing with BASIC, a programming language that shipped with DOS. I'd done a few BASIC "hello world" things in electronics class in 1981/1982, but now I was actually able to test out what I was writing. I tried to get into C, but never had the time.

                    Since the beginning, Compuserve used numeric IDs for everyone. (I was 71211,3370...I still remember!) At some point in 1994, they were working on a new system that would let us use a real "username", which could be used as an e-mail address. At first they were only offering it to those of us who wanted to host a free website on their "OurWorld" site, so I found whatever I could about HTML and threw something together (using Compuserve's crude HTML authoring/publishing program), then launched it on their site the first day the service was available. I originally did this only so nobody would grab my chosen username.

                    Little did I know that I'd end up doing this for a living, and while I was never able to take up other languages than BASIC before, I sort of grew into PHP and have actually built some online apps for clients.

                    Still boggles my mind how we had a text-based interface all those years, and we got by just fine. Still, I have tools today that weren't even dreamed of back then, and I'm a lot more productive now than I ever was back then.

                    Heck, I still remember my cousin working at Radio Shack, loading a program into a TRS-80 via a cassette tape...this definitely dates a person.

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                    • #25
                      I had a radio Shack Model 1 their 1st computer, went from there to their TRS-80 Color Computer it was really smoking after I added the 16 K memory chip mod I found an external 20 MEG hard drive for the COCO on sale at $299.00 I thought I had died and gone to heaven



                      Heck, I still remember my cousin working at Radio Shack, loading a program into a TRS-80 via a cassette tape...this definitely dates a person. [/quote]

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                      • #26
                        I was on CompuServe in the early 80s.
                        73145,117
                        Back then I spent $300 a month for 300 baud.
                        Met my wife on CIS' CB back in '84. Together ever since.
                        Attended the first online wedding which was written up in InfoWorld, probably in 83. Attended CB parties in Ohio during the early days.
                        Involved in AVSIG and the Claris Forums back then.

                        My computer then was a Sinclair XZ80 then moved up to an Atari 800.

                        Also had a PLINK, GEnie, AOL when it was a Mac only company.
                        Prodigy when they had ads at the time and bottom of the screen.

                        Internet I think I had dialup with netrail.com, netcom.com then ASDL with speakeasy.net and now FIos with Verizon.
                        ...steven
                        www.318ti.org (vB3.8) | www.nccbmwcca.org (vB4.2)
                        bmwcca.org/forum | m135i.net
                        "I tried to clean this up but this thread is beyond redemption." - Steve Machol

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by RedWingFan
                          At some point in 1994, they were working on a new system that would let us use a real "username"
                          Long time CIS users had first crack at their own email addresses. Their system got screwed up and I was unable to have my name. I think that is when I finally cut the cord.
                          ...steven
                          www.318ti.org (vB3.8) | www.nccbmwcca.org (vB4.2)
                          bmwcca.org/forum | m135i.net
                          "I tried to clean this up but this thread is beyond redemption." - Steve Machol

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Brad.loo
                            I enjoy reading about how you old timers got into all of this. Must have been great times back then, shame I missed it.
                            Life was simpler at 300 baud.
                            Pictures where more like ASCI art. I bet I still have mine that was made at CompuServe.
                            ...steven
                            www.318ti.org (vB3.8) | www.nccbmwcca.org (vB4.2)
                            bmwcca.org/forum | m135i.net
                            "I tried to clean this up but this thread is beyond redemption." - Steve Machol

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