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  • Martz
    replied
    What about having a multiplayer game of Doom on two 486 machines via null-modem cable?

    Copying the massive (2MB I think) files from one machine to another using MS-DOS utils intersrv.exe and interlnk.exe over a null-modem/serial connection. Damn that was painful! Must have been my first instance of "piracy" too - but I don't think at that stage the term had even been invented. Not my first computer experience, but certainly a memorable one.

    Sorry to be OT - just triggered some nostalgia.

    Leave a comment:


  • centris
    replied
    Hell, I just realised that while I was trying to Network our Apple computers in the office using the printer cables, some of you guys were still chewing on rusks LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave#
    replied
    Originally posted by Wayne Luke
    If by being a hobbyist you mean pulling 6 figures a year doing computer related work, enjoying technology with my family with minimal fuss and maintaining a complete network including file and media servers, then I guess you are right.
    Yes that is what I mean.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zachery
    replied
    Apple borrowed from Xerox, Windows Borrowed from Apple, etc etc.

    Its a vicious cycle. I'm aware of how OSX works and its design frame, It runs and acts alot like Windows XP does, except for a few quirks (mostly browser / window things that bother me). And it was done for a reason too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Luke
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave#
    As I said, I'm sure Windows fits the needs for some hobbyists.
    If by being a hobbyist you mean pulling 6 figures a year doing computer related work, enjoying technology with my family with minimal fuss and maintaining a complete network including file and media servers, then I guess you are right.

    Leave a comment:


  • ILTK
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave#
    As I said, I'm sure Windows fits the needs for some hobbyists.
    I guess you are talking about servers here right

    Leave a comment:


  • tamarian
    replied
    Originally posted by Zachery
    Eh, I have a OSX machine, and while I had used Mac OS's in the past, OSX feels alot like a windows enviroment aside from some small quirks.
    Apple's OSX is a lot closer to Linux (particularly one of KDE themes) than to Windows

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave#
    replied
    Now, I know you want everyone to use one flavor of Linux or another and no other operating system fits your standards. That is what makes competition a wonderful thing. You can choose what you want and I can choose what I want. I can also express my opinions on why I didn't choose the same thing you did.
    Nobody said you couldn't express your views Wayne regardless of how outlandlish and ill concieved they may be.

    As I said, I'm sure Windows fits the needs for some hobbyists.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Luke
    replied
    Originally posted by Dave#
    I have yet to find a piece of hardware I couldn't get to work on Linux, nevertheless fair do's. Linux isn't for everyone for many hobbyists Windows may be the better choice but to dismiss it totally just shows how out of touch you are with modern computing.
    I don't dismiss it totally. The webservers I use have Linux installed on them. It doesn't however fit my home office computing needs. The main issue I have is application support. Open Office does not have the functionality or features that I desire in an Office suite. I don't want to use an Emulator or translation layer to run games and I wish to run all my applications without problems. As far as hardware my TV Tuner cards do not work on the versions of Linux that I have tested and there is no synchronization software for our cellphones or my wife's MP3 player available from the manufacturers for the Linux platform.

    When a linux distribution can run programs such as City of Heroes, Red Alert: Command and Conquer, Starcraft, Everquest II, Toontown, Age of Mythology, Battle for Middle Earth, The Sims 2, MSN Explorer, Barbie: Swan Princess, Sylvan Learning Center tutorials, Pagis Pro, Printmaster Deluxe, Microsoft Office, Dreamweaver, Flash, Contribute, Captivate, Napster, and iTunes in a native mode without having to go an obtain multiple versions of WINE on various licenses then I can re-evaluate it for my 6 home office and family computers. Right now it is much easier to standardize on a single operating system and suite of applications.

    Of the two options in the Poll, I think KDE is more advanced and better suited to my eventual needs. It just absolutely has to have cross-platform compliancy for a family environment. Show me a Linux distribution that fits my needs, doesn't require me to configure every little piddling thing from the command line and I will give it a serious look. Not a distribution with a 30 day trial to Cross-over office. A single cross-platform compliant install with no extra or hidden fees.

    Now, I know you want everyone to use one flavor of Linux or another and no other operating system fits your standards. That is what makes competition a wonderful thing. You can choose what you want and I can choose what I want. I can also express my opinions on why I didn't choose the same thing you did.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zachery
    replied
    Eh, I have a OSX machine, and while I had used Mac OS's in the past, OSX feels alot like a windows enviroment aside from some small quirks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dave#
    replied
    Originally posted by Wayne Luke
    Simply stating my opinion... Have a hard drive which I use to "test" various Linux distributions on a semi-regular basis, about every six months. Nothing available yet gives me what I want as compareable to Windows XP. The breadth of hardware support, application support or ease of use is not met to my standards.
    I have yet to find a piece of hardware I couldn't get to work on Linux, nevertheless fair do's. Linux isn't for everyone for many hobbyists Windows may be the better choice but to dismiss it totally just shows how out of touch you are with modern computing.

    Leave a comment:


  • tamarian
    replied
    Originally posted by tgillespie
    The $100 or so it costs to buy an XP license greatly outways the hassel of getting Linux to work the way XP does in the desktop environment.
    This works both ways. Imagine the hassle a Mac user has to go through to have XP (or Linux) work the way they expect it to. I'm usually at a loss intalling networks on friends XP PC's when they buy a new router and figure I could help them, then I'd waste a lot of time figuring how XP arranges things to work, where it takes me minutes to do it in a Linux environment.

    An XP user would have a hard time navigating anything else, same as a Mac user, or a Linux user. The exception users are few, usually tech support who work in mult platfroms all day.

    Leave a comment:


  • tgillespie
    replied
    The $100 or so it costs to buy an XP license greatly outways the hassel of getting Linux to work the way XP does in the desktop environment. There is nothing that Linux offers that XP does not in my case. I still love toying around with the latest distrobutions, but on average, they spend a total of 1 week on my hard drive.

    Leave a comment:


  • ILTK
    replied
    Yeah I guess it realy depends on what programs you need in your daily routine, and also how much vendor lock-in you have to deal with.

    Still, Linux has moved a lot forward in the last couple years, but still has some way to go before everyone can just jump ship and go all out Linux, however much they'd want to.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wayne Luke
    replied
    Originally posted by ILTK
    Most people switch to Linux wanting it to be 'just like windows' and that will be a disapointment becaus it wont ever be like that.

    What I did, was to start on Windows switching to all OSS substitues for the programs I used that had both Linux/windows versions, then do a dual boot setup (I use those removeable harddrive cases you put the HD in so you can switch drives easily) and slowly start getting used to Linux, switching back and forth so it does not become a pain that you can't get something to work under Linux. When I had everything under control, and I was comfortable with everything, I started to find it a pain going back to windows, I only realy use windows for gaming now, all my dev. tools on Linux kicks the cr*p out of the windows versions.
    I did this once about 2 years ago.... Spent 9 months transitioning from Windows to Linux and then spent 6 months on Linux Exclusively. Kept hitting roadblocks when looking for equivalent programs that fit my needs, spent more time trying to configure and patch the OS than getting work done, and was generally miserable trying to get things accomplished. Maybe it was the distribution I finally settled on (SUSE 8.1 Professional) but didn't quite sit well with me.

    Thinking of bringing an inhouse webserver online using Linux but my Window's box handling that job works fine. Plus since most games don't work on Linux and my children and wife wouldn't be able to use most of their programs on the OS, it makes sense to standardize with a single OS and set of applications.

    Leave a comment:

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