Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Networking Questions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Networking Questions

    I've been assigned to bringing a 1997 Gateway up to speed at work. So far I'm going to update the memory, add a new hard drive, Windows 2000 (NOT XP, I can only add a certain amt of memory and the processor speed is not great) and an Ethernet port.

    We currently have our network set up like so.

    COMPUTER A-------------Computer B
    (Windows Me) (Windows XP Pro)
    |
    LPT
    |
    PRINTER

    Those two computers are very close to each other.

    The computer that I want to connect to the Network is located in "The Office" which is not near those two computers. I was researching cables on CompUSA and was confused by the difference between a Patch cable and a Crossover cable. What's the difference? All I know is that they only sell really long PATCH cables, not crossovers.

    I have a Network switch which we haven't yet used, but I am wondering what the difference is between hubs, switches and routers. Can I connect the Gateway to the Network using the switch?

    I am new to networking and find it vastly different than what I am used to.

    Can anyone here answer my questions?
    | DiscBurn | CD & DVD Replication services, film and VHS to DVD, and duplication equipment
    |
    Disc On Demand | Short-run CD & DVD duplication... all online.

  • #2
    I can help ya out with some of those Q's

    A crossover cable is mainly used to connect two pc's together (I had to use one to connect my xbox to my pc). Just get a regular cable and connect it to a router/hub, much easier and less of a hassle

    For routers/switches/hubs.... from what I've gathered, a hub takes a single IP and assigns its own IP's to whatever's connected to it. A router has to have a unique IP for everything connected to it (including one for the router). Mainly, you'll get slightly better connections by using a router. As for a switch... no clue

    I hope that helps, I'm sure someone helpful will expand on what I said and help you out more if you still don't get it

    MGM out

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Lacrosse Boy
      I've been assigned to bringing a 1997 Gateway up to speed at work. So far I'm going to update the memory, add a new hard drive, Windows 2000 (NOT XP, I can only add a certain amt of memory and the processor speed is not great) and an Ethernet port.

      We currently have our network set up like so.

      COMPUTER A-------------Computer B
      (Windows Me) (Windows XP Pro)
      |
      LPT
      |
      PRINTER

      Those two computers are very close to each other.

      The computer that I want to connect to the Network is located in "The Office" which is not near those two computers. I was researching cables on CompUSA and was confused by the difference between a Patch cable and a Crossover cable. What's the difference? All I know is that they only sell really long PATCH cables, not crossovers.

      I have a Network switch which we haven't yet used, but I am wondering what the difference is between hubs, switches and routers. Can I connect the Gateway to the Network using the switch?

      I am new to networking and find it vastly different than what I am used to.

      Can anyone here answer my questions?
      As mentioned above, a crossover cable is used to go from PC-->PC and a regular patch cable is used with a router/hub/switch.

      Personally, I would avoid a hub as they are not smart and they cannot direct traffic, unlike a switch & router.

      Since you have a switch already, I would use that.

      If I'm reading your post correctly, you have a total of 3 PCs (computer A + B + gateway?) and one printer you need to hook up..I'd use the switch, place it somewhere it will be accessible by all 3 computers, take patch cables from each PC directly from their NIC (network card) to the switch. (unless you want to use a wireless setup) After they are connected via the switch, share the printer that's physically hooked up to one computer, and use it as a network printer so it's accessible by all computers on that network.
      This will actually be quite simple to setup.
      Webmaster / Administrator
      www.MegaGames.com
      www.MGForums.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Vile
        As mentioned above, a crossover cable is used to go from PC-->PC and a regular patch cable is used with a router/hub/switch.

        Personally, I would avoid a hub as they are not smart and they cannot direct traffic, unlike a switch & router.

        Since you have a switch already, I would use that.

        If I'm reading your post correctly, you have a total of 3 PCs (computer A + B + gateway?) and one printer you need to hook up..I'd use the switch, place it somewhere it will be accessible by all 3 computers, take patch cables from each PC directly from their NIC (network card) to the switch. (unless you want to use a wireless setup) After they are connected via the switch, share the printer that's physically hooked up to one computer, and use it as a network printer so it's accessible by all computers on that network.
        This will actually be quite simple to setup.
        Yea, that's a good idea... use the switch (albiet idk what it is) that you already have and set it up the way he said. That should be fairly simple and cheap

        MGM out

        Comment


        • #5
          I'll call the Gateway "Computer C".

          Networking the two computers together was extremely easy. I'm just a bit apprehensive about doing it with three computers.

          One Computer B there is a folder titled "Documents" which is shared with Computer A. Will it be shared with Computer C when I get it hooked in?

          And does the switch require any configuration or can I just plug the appropriate cables in and get going?
          | DiscBurn | CD & DVD Replication services, film and VHS to DVD, and duplication equipment
          |
          Disc On Demand | Short-run CD & DVD duplication... all online.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Lacrosse Boy
            I'll call the Gateway "Computer C".

            Networking the two computers together was extremely easy. I'm just a bit apprehensive about doing it with three computers.

            One Computer B there is a folder titled "Documents" which is shared with Computer A. Will it be shared with Computer C when I get it hooked in?

            And does the switch require any configuration or can I just plug the appropriate cables in and get going?
            I think it's dependant on your computer's name (right click my computer, properties, computer name on windows xp).... when you go to view the shared documents, it'll list the computers based on their computer name and you can choose which to view

            MGM out

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Lacrosse Boy
              I'll call the Gateway "Computer C".

              Networking the two computers together was extremely easy. I'm just a bit apprehensive about doing it with three computers.

              One Computer B there is a folder titled "Documents" which is shared with Computer A. Will it be shared with Computer C when I get it hooked in?

              And does the switch require any configuration or can I just plug the appropriate cables in and get going?
              It's basically the same idea as when you did 2 computers, and it honestly shouldn't be any tougher. (I've setup large networks using hundreds of computers at one time, and it was really straightforward)

              Anyway as for the documents, by default it will be shared with Computer C (since C will be on the same network as the others) but you should be able to set access permissions to stop this, if needed.

              As for the setup, you could setup an internal IP for the computers, or just leave it as dynamic. Hook up the patch cables, and make sure all computers are on the same network (within the network settings on each PC)

              If you worried about the computers using different operating systems, it doesn't make a difference. On my network at home, 2 computers are running XP, one is running 98, and the other is running 2000 Pro
              Webmaster / Administrator
              www.MegaGames.com
              www.MGForums.com

              Comment


              • #8
                So I went to CompUSA and saw the word patch cable. But after I instpected it and got home, upon closer inspection I saw that it was Crossover, with the word Patch on the package!

                What is it that I need? Or will those cords work?
                | DiscBurn | CD & DVD Replication services, film and VHS to DVD, and duplication equipment
                |
                Disc On Demand | Short-run CD & DVD duplication... all online.

                Comment


                • #9
                  No... Crossover cables are only good for hooking up two computers to each other and no more. If you don't do it right, then next time there is a new computer, you will have the same issue. This is what you need to do to make a "true network" and allow for expansion.

                  Get yourself a 4 port Router/Switch. Any one you can get will work but I recommend the Linksys BEFSR41. I am sure the one you have will be just fine.

                  Hook each of your PC's into the Switch using CAT5 Patch Cables, crossover cables will not work. The last port can be hooked up to the uplink on a second router in the future to provide more space.

                  Unless you get a router which has DHCP, you have to assign each computer an IP address and a workgroup so they can talk to each other. IPs in the 192.168.1.XXX range work well and won't interfere if you add Internet later. Just make sure the first three octets are the same. Assign each computer to the same workgroup (company name without spaces is good choice) and give them each a unique name (for the people not the network).

                  So for example, you name your "office computer" as office. When you want to access a shared folder called documents, you would browse to \\office\documents\. If computer A is called printserver then accessing the printers would be \\printserver\printer1, \\printserver\printer2\, etc...

                  This page http://www.linksys.com/edu/ will help you learn more about networking 101.
                  Translations provided by Google.

                  Wayne Luke
                  The Rabid Badger - a vBulletin Cloud demonstration site.
                  vBulletin 5 API

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for all the help and the great resource!

                    At CompUSA I picked up a 100' long cable which will be sufficient for going to the office. However, the only type they had was Category 5e. Will this be compatable with the 5 calbs which are on the way? Or do I have to return that as well?
                    | DiscBurn | CD & DVD Replication services, film and VHS to DVD, and duplication equipment
                    |
                    Disc On Demand | Short-run CD & DVD duplication... all online.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Lacrosse Boy
                      Thanks for all the help and the great resource!

                      At CompUSA I picked up a 100' long cable which will be sufficient for going to the office. However, the only type they had was Category 5e. Will this be compatable with the 5 calbs which are on the way? Or do I have to return that as well?
                      Most people are phasing out the old ones and switching to 5e & 6.
                      It should work fine with your setup.
                      Webmaster / Administrator
                      www.MegaGames.com
                      www.MGForums.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The hard drive is the slowest component so a fast one (as far as hard drives go) will make a noticable difference. I suggest installing a 36.7GB Raptor drive.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I purchased a new 20GB Hard Drive (we don't need anymore) for that computer, the only problem is that I had to put the jumper pin in so that the computer could be "allowed" to see it. Since it is older I had to limit the setting, however, now on Windows it shows as there only being about 2 GB. How can I up the amount so that it shows the actual size?

                          I have no plans on using the old hard drive at all.
                          | DiscBurn | CD & DVD Replication services, film and VHS to DVD, and duplication equipment
                          |
                          Disc On Demand | Short-run CD & DVD duplication... all online.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Try getting a bios update.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hard drive installed. I haven't been up to the task of running the Network cable above the ceiling yet, but I did just receive a shipment of raceway so that bare cords aren't hanging down walls. Plus, I've just upgraded the ME computer to 2000. Like 2000 infinately more.

                              Anyhow, I am having a problem. Okay, another question.

                              The computer in the office is a Gateway G6-333c. All I can ever use is 16 colors. First I started out on NT Workstation with a small screen. Then formated everything, installed Windows 2000, a new video card, and a new monitor. Still, I can only see 16 colors! I can't adjust it, it won't go anywhere beyond 16 colors, yet both the monitor and video card requirements show it as able to.

                              16 colors is awfully ugly to look at.
                              | DiscBurn | CD & DVD Replication services, film and VHS to DVD, and duplication equipment
                              |
                              Disc On Demand | Short-run CD & DVD duplication... all online.

                              Comment

                              widgetinstance 262 (Related Topics) skipped due to lack of content & hide_module_if_empty option.
                              Working...
                              X